Three K's Comparison

Well what do you know, I at least got B right but was completely thrown by the Kanile'a and KoAloha. I'm really surprised that A wasn't KoAloha since it was easily the brightest sounding for me. I feel very confused right now.

I'm also surprised that I got B right since I don't have that much experience listening to a Kamaka with fluorocarbons as I have nylons on mine. Still, I guess I could discern the typical tone for both the uke and the strings. Or maybe I just got lucky.

I have to say that I prefer C most and A the least as well, which is very weird since I prefer my own Kanile'a to my KoAloha in person. For me, Kanile'a has the warmest and fullest sound whereas KoAloha is typically brighter and punchier (while still having lots of depth in the sound of course). I can't really say if Kamaka is somewhere in the middle or if it just has its own unique characteristic.

I did a little bit of testing with my other Kamaka with the nylon strings still on it from the factory, and it did have a very distinctive sound. I strongly prefer fluorocarbons, so I quickly swapped. That isn't the uke in this recording, by the way, but you are right that the strings do change it a bit.

I will also note that the Kamaka used here has been played for several years, and the KoAloha has just under a year on it. The Kanile'a is brand new, and only has a few hours of play time. It may well change a bit as it opens up. I'm also not yet convinced that the Worth browns are the way to go on the Kanile'a. Needs more testing...
 
OK, I'll give it a shot before looking. B and C were both warmer than A, So I'll guess B or C was a Kamaka. C seemed a little "clearer" to me and the B seemed "fuller", so I'll say the B is Kamaka. Neither the A nor C sound like my 10 year old Kanilea k1-C and I've never owned a Koaloha, so I'll stop at my guess that the B is a Kamaka. EDIT: Now that I've looked, it would be interesting to hear all three with the same strings.
 
Last edited:
Well what do you know, I at least got B right but was completely thrown by the Kanile'a and KoAloha. I'm really surprised that A wasn't KoAloha since it was easily the brightest sounding for me. I feel very confused right now.

I'm also surprised that I got B right since I don't have that much experience listening to a Kamaka with fluorocarbons as I have nylons on mine. Still, I guess I could discern the typical tone for both the uke and the strings. Or maybe I just got lucky.

I have to say that I prefer C most and A the least as well, which is very weird since I prefer my own Kanile'a to my KoAloha in person. For me, Kanile'a has the warmest and fullest sound whereas KoAloha is typically brighter and punchier (while still having lots of depth in the sound of course). I can't really say if Kamaka is somewhere in the middle or if it just has its own unique characteristic.
Same here. I think the Worth Browns changed the Kanile'a tone for me, which I usually find complex and full of overtones.
 
Top Bottom