Tuner question, (overkill?)

Crazyviking

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I just got my first Ukulele, I am using an app on the phone to tune. It seems ok to me but I can see the need for a clip on if you ever end up anyplace with back ground noise. I have been researching them and am impressed with the Peterson Stroboclip. I have seen an online review that dinged it for being complicated, I can see where you can get off in the weeds if you want but just using it straight seems the same as any of the chromatic ones. Is it worth the money or is it not really important? I am sure there are good arguments on both sides. I am just curious what the group thinks.
 
check out the D'Addario mini. It is tiny and works like a charm. Or just learn to tune by ear...no batteries, reliable, cheap.
 
Peterson tuners are great, but they work slower than less accurate tuners. High accuracy is important if you are performing with a group, but not so much if you are playing by yourself. I think strobe tuners like Peterson are accurate to 0.1 cents, while the cheapest clip-on tuners are accurate to 1.0 cents (1/10 the price for the 1/10 the accuracy vs Peterson).
 
I just got my first Ukulele, I am using an app on the phone to tune. It seems ok to me but I can see the need for a clip on if you ever end up anyplace with back ground noise. I have been researching them and am impressed with the Peterson Stroboclip. I have seen an online review that dinged it for being complicated, I can see where you can get off in the weeds if you want but just using it straight seems the same as any of the chromatic ones. Is it worth the money or is it not really important? I am sure there are good arguments on both sides. I am just curious what the group thinks.
I find the Snark, D’addario etc clip ons work fine for the price. YMMV
 
I like having a tuner that turns on with one press and turns off with one press. Although I like the Peterson, it's a long-hold button, so I reach for a Snark instead. If I was carrying the tuner with me, I would prefer the buttons don't accidentally get pushed and waste my battery, so I'd reach for the Peterson.

I got mine for $29 and would not have bought it full price.
 
I like my Peterson, and I don't find it slow at all. It reacts as quickly as my wife's Snark, and is equally easy to use. Set and forget if you don't want to get into the weeds. As far as worth it, that's kinda up to the individual. The Snark seems as accurate and costs much less
 
I have the D'Addario mini and the Peterson, and honestly, I don't see much difference between them. I'm not sorry I have the Peterson, but if an all-but-invisible little thing that cost one-fifth the price is doing the job, I'm not sure I'd do it again....except that it's the one I use all the time, so I guess I would...right?

:unsure: Long pause :unsure:....

Okay, thinking some more about WHY I use the Peterson almost exclusively, one thing I like about it, and the stroboscopic approach in general, is that it really highlights the organic, interactive nature of creating a note. That is, it's not JUST that the STRING is making the note, but the string in combination with how you're plucking the string, and if applicable, how you're fretting. You can WATCH the note go in or out of tune as you adjust your playing, which I find is a better place to focus your energy. It's only in tune if the string is at the right tension AND you're PLAYING it right. Nothing like a strobe for exploring those dynamics.

Not that you can't also use it like a "regular" tuner to answer the question, "Is my A string in tune or not?" You certainly can. But if you want to dig into the question, "Am I playing this note or this chord as well as I can?", then there's really no substitute for a stroboscopic tuner. Regular ones will help you tune your strings, and yeah, that's exactly the sense in which all my tuners are at least roughly interchangeable. The Peterson is the one to get if you want to also tune your PLAYING...and if you're not interested in PLAYING in tune, then why bother with a tuner at all?

And that's the longer answer why I have a dozen tuners laying around (had a bad case of TAS for a while there :ROFLMAO:), but use the Peterson, and only the Peterson, every day. And why I'm coming around to say that it's the ONLY one I'd buy again. Plenty fast, plenty easy, and tells me vastly more than the others.
 
I just got my first Ukulele, I am using an app on the phone to tune. It seems ok to me but I can see the need for a clip on if you ever end up anyplace with back ground noise. I have been researching them and am impressed with the Peterson Stroboclip. I have seen an online review that dinged it for being complicated, I can see where you can get off in the weeds if you want but just using it straight seems the same as any of the chromatic ones. Is it worth the money or is it not really important? I am sure there are good arguments on both sides. I am just curious what the group thinks.
I bought a Peterson tuner about six months ago. Now I also have a little Aklot branded tuner that came with my very first uke. However, I use a tuner app 99.9% of my time whilst tuning.

I've realized with using all three: the Aklot tuner is quite accurate when compared to the tuner app (FFT spectrum), and the Peterson tuner is even more accurate, and takes a bit of finessing to learn where the sweet spot actually is.

The Peterson doesn't show you a big bright green A or C, it oscillates until it settles to the actual chord frequency. So at least for me, I had to compare it to my tuner app before I knew what I was looking at. On the Peterson, one way is sharp, the other flat.

Is the Peterson strobe tuner worth it? I'd say so if you're serious about playing and accuracy.
 
I'm happy with my old Korg CA-30 chromatic. Simple operation, simple AAA batteries. Or a 440 tuning fork, really simple and no batteries! I sometimes use a Kratt pitch pipe that I've checked the "A" on using the Korg.

Doesn't clip on, no fear of damaging a headstock.

Question - why do people obsess over one set of tuning machines weighing 2 ounces more than another, but think nothing of what the clip on tuner weighs, that they leave in place? ...
 
check out the D'Addario mini. It is tiny and works like a charm. Or just learn to tune by ear...no batteries, reliable, cheap.
Is it me, but it looks like that is just plastic won't it potentially scratch the head? Also I have a KoAloha so the head stock has a different shape.
 
My Snark does ALMOST everything I need it to do. Its one deficiency is that, to my admittedly- unreliable ear, confirmed by relative tuning to the E string, Snark’s “A” always leaves Yowling Tom’s A string a tad flat.
 
A bit off the mark, but I would recommend a chromatic only (no special instrument modes) and a bit of caution with snarks (they sometimes/often break, plenty of threads on this topic). Honestly for me, any are good enough, even cheap uke kit tuners. The only one that ever seemed off (verified by multiple other tuners) was a snark that came with a used uke, but it was one made for “guitar bass & violin” per the mark on the back. A daddario will work on a koaloha headstock.
 
A bit off the mark, but I would recommend a chromatic only (no special instrument modes) and a bit of caution with snarks (they sometimes/often break, plenty of threads on this topic). Honestly for me, any are good enough, even cheap uke kit tuners. The only one that ever seemed off (verified by multiple other tuners) was a snark that came with a used uke, but it was one made for “guitar bass & violin” per the mark on the back. A daddario will work on a koaloha headstock.
I’m sure for marketing, money, or both, but I can’t understand why they aren’t all chromatic!

I use ins tuner on my phone and iPad. I also have a snark, an eno something or other, and a D’addario micro headstock tuner. I find them all fine, though phone/ipad app can be tricky if there are other noises/sounds near by, but prefer the micro tuner. I can see it clearly, it stays on my instrument well without having to be removed, and good battery life.
 
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I've been able to tune my ukes in an extremely loud environment with the GuitarTuna app on my phone. Mics on phones are pretty impressive these days. I did have to hold it close to the phone though. It's a free app. It has a uke setting. I have no complaints about it. Batteries die on tuners at the worst possible moment. Never fails.
 
Petersen is overkill. If you insist on strobe get the tc elec for 1/4 price. Best to just get any clip on for 10 bucks. IMO Snark is a simply a popular marketing company. Their product is fragile, eats batteries, has plastic that goes gooey and sticky, and is 5x overpriced. Had 2. Both broke.
 
I love my Peterson tuner so much that when my dog ate the first one (he didn’t eat the battery - he’s fine) I replaced it immediately (the tuner, not the dog, obviously. Although it would have been cheaper to replace the dog).

I freely admit to being extremely obsessive about tuning, but the Peterson also feels more robust and generally much better made than other tuners I’ve had. Admittedly it was no match for the jaws of a determined lurcher puppy, but short of that I wouldn’t expect ever to have to replace it.
 
I've gone through a variety of tuners, including the D'Addario/Planet Waves Mini and the Peterson. I'm now using only the D'Addario Nexxus 360 because it's USB recharge, has the brightest screen of any others, plus rotates and bends in any direction. It's only chromatic, so one button turns it on and off. It's $30 and worth every penny to me, I have fourteen, six tenor ukes and eight bass ukes.
 
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