UAS is real, let's discuss...

Well, size to concert would meet the criteria, but the big IF is whether you want to go to a concert size. In that case, one of each size would work well and they can both be Pono, same wood type or different.

If you stay with tenor, there might be two opposite directions you could go: mahagony gives a mellower, warmer, and more subdued sound. Koa gives a brighter, livelier and traditional Hawaiian sound. Look at Martin for mahagony and the Ks for koa. The Ks are not "beyond your ability". At any ability level, they play well, sound great, and feel good. I bought a KoAloha as my second ukulele a few months after beginning and it made playing ukulele (at a beginner level) more joyful.

Buying another Pono tenor will be very similar to your current one, even with a wood change. That is okay if that is what you seek, but a used K at around $800 is a consideration, especially as you improve and become more curious about different ukuleles.

Added: Consider this Opio from KoAloha. It is the Pono equivalent, made in Asia to their design. Acacia is the generic wood that koa is from and sounds similar:
Thanks for this. Interesting that you don't think another Pono with a different wood would sound different enough. I think my gut would be to go with something like a cedar top or all mahogany for that more mellow sound. I'll definitely figure it out more as I grow into my mango. I thought the mango's were supposed to be similar in sound to koa?
 
Thanks for this. Interesting that you don't think another Pono with a different wood would sound different enough. I think my gut would be to go with something like a cedar top or all mahogany for that more mellow sound. I'll definitely figure it out more as I grow into my mango. I thought the mango's were supposed to be similar in sound to koa?
Mango is perhaps a "step" mellower than koa. Brighter sound might be spruce?

But different woods from the same manufacturer tend to sound more similar than the using different manufacturers with the same wood. So, to be repetitive, a mango tenor from any manufacturer would likely have a greater difference in sound than another Pono built out of any other wood.
 
Good timing as I have been fighting the UAS bug since a visit to Frets in PA and getting my hands and ears on some tenors instead of my baritones. They had a Flight Fireball that was a beauty looks and sound wise but just not exactly what I want. YouTube reviews are once more the order of the day as I search.

Pono MB was bought used at a good price and I agree with all the posts that recommend checking that option. (Yes Rick I am thinking of you once more). However I've been seriously thinking about upping my expenditure to about $1k and ordering a satin Loprinzi come the fall. I know that it would sound and feel different in a good way. What's holding me back is not actually holding one to see if it feels right for me. Agree 100% that if at all possible get hands on with other ukes before buying that next one.

Maybe take kids with you and let them choose what they want to play?
 
Oh yeah, for sure. I've been up and down the list on their site. Was looking for the more "personal" recommendations and also the types of playing you might enjoy on Mahogany?

I've been playing a Taylor guitar with a Cedar top, but I can't remember the side woods (I think it's koa on back and sides actually). It's beautiful and mellow sounding vs. the Koa wood top guitar my wife has. Her's is great sounding too, but in a different way.
As a self-confessed aNueNue fan-girl I will gladly throw props to the african mahogany AMM3 by aNueNue. Put a set of la bella strings with wound low g and you have stratospheric harmonics that go on for days.

UAS? Yep it's real and it definitely brings a learning curve with it. A gorgeous well built uke won't make you an overnight sensation but it most likely will may you want to play more often and sound more pleasing to your ears. OTOH, enjoy every minute of it!
 
Instead of asking a bunch of people you don't know about which uke to buy, why don't you visit as many uke stores as possible and see which you like the best. I would say that with only a few weeks of playing, you probably need more experience before buying an $800 Ukulele...but after some time, you will have developed some opinions of what you should buy that would suit your needs and dreams, not ours. Good luck.

This sort of defeats the point of a ukulele forum, doesn’t it? Besides, sometimes Guitar Center is the only option, and that is seldom a good place to go for ukulele experience.
 
Thanks Mike, I'm just getting a discussion started. At the end of the day, I will make my own decision, just like I did with my Pono Mango and I'm sure I could play it basically forever and never need another ukulele. My dream is to play and have fun, with my kids too. That requires having another instrument down the line. Appreciate your input (y)

Edit: I've been to every store and played every ukulele in a 50 mile radius of my home. None of them carry anything in that midrange. Almost all of them sell Kala, Fender, off brands, and one has a single Breedlove.
Think about making a uke from a kit, like a StewMac Tenor kit. My second uke was from a kit and I still play it every day, it's a fantastic uke and it was a lot of fun to make, and sounds great. If you think your kids will enjoy making their own uke with you, you should consider it. They can be made with tools common to most homes. You can buy as many tools as you like, but you really only need a few.
 
This sort of defeats the point of a ukulele forum, doesn’t it? Besides, sometimes Guitar Center is the only option, and that is seldom a good place to go for ukulele experience.
I guess if the only thing you do on a forum is ask which uke to buy, then it would defeat the purpose of a uke forum. If you have other interests, then no it doesn't. Plus, most people online are crazy anyway. I would never take their advice.
 
This sort of defeats the point of a ukulele forum, doesn’t it? Besides, sometimes Guitar Center is the only option, and that is seldom a good place to go for ukulele experience.
That’s the case with me. I live in a rural area and the nearest music store is an hour away. They rarely, if ever, have any ukes besides crummy Mahalos and Anahi’s. I have to do all my research online and hope that what I’m buying will suit me.
 
That’s the case with me. I live in a rural area and the nearest music store is an hour away. They rarely, if ever, have any ukes besides crummy Mahalos and Anahi’s. I have to do all my research online and hope that what I’m buying will suit me.
Yup here too. Although I have a couple of very well respected luthiers not too far from me (Steve Doreen at Lone Tree and Martin Beck).
 
I guess if the only thing you do on a forum is ask which uke to buy, then it would defeat the purpose of a uke forum. If you have other interests, then no it doesn't. Plus, most people online are crazy anyway. I would never take their advice.
I'm confused. So are you advising the OP to take your advice or not take your advice?
 
Think about making a uke from a kit, like a StewMac Tenor kit. My second uke was from a kit and I still play it every day, it's a fantastic uke and it was a lot of fun to make, and sounds great. If you think your kids will enjoy making their own uke with you, you should consider it. They can be made with tools common to most homes. You can buy as many tools as you like, but you really only need a few.
Now that’s an idea! I might have to give that a shot myself.
 
Bro, it's ok to start a collection. I have 9 ukes, built up over 11 years of playing - all different types (solid, laminate, plastic, travel, electric, banjo) and sizes (bari, tenor, concert, soprano), but mostly concerts and sopranos. Some cheap, others expensive, and I enjoy playing them all. I have found that over time the desire to add new instruments has diminished, as I feel I've covered all the bases. Only added another recently, after a 4 year hiatus from UAS.
 
If you haven't spent hours listening to the Hawaii Music Supply podcasts, I'd highly suggest a good pair of headphones and a comfortable couch, bed, or chair.

This video was the start of my rabbit hole and it hasn't stopped going deeper in two years. Be careful!



They also have plenty videos comparing all the K brands and many customs. There are more than many that they don't carry or have often. Just keep listening and playing until find a sound you're looking for. And that will likely continue to change.

Gotta add in the shameless plug for myself! I have a couple Marketplace listings that might not fit the immediate bill, but included some samples. A koa Maui Music concert and a Romero Creations spalted mango STC... They're both concert scale with very different sounds. My STC sound sample compares a with a different soprano, concert, and tenor with various woods.

Welcome to the UAS madness and enjoy the journey!! We're here for you!!
 
I had a similar thought a year back and got a sister to my Pono cedar top acacia deluxe tenor, so found a nice used Pono spruce top acacia deluxe tenor with slotted headstock on Craigslist for maybe 300 or so? It was great, but the problem was it was way too similar to what I already had, but sounded less good. I just connected with it slightly less and there was no reason to play it, or to keep it.

I ended up selling it and getting a baritone instead. This way it is different enough where having both doesn’t feel like collecting just for collections sake. They look different and sound different. The baritone I got is a Pono acacia deluxe, which I paid 300 for and couldn’t be happier with it.

I’m not sure if anyone has suggested a baritone yet, but I feel like for me, once moving up the sizes (started with soprano and concert, then tenor and baritone) it is very hard to go back down.
 
Hey Y'all, Weatherman here. I introduced myself here about 2 weeks ago. I had ordered my first Ukulele, a Pono MGTD, and thought I would join this wonderful community.

Here I am, just a bit more than a week into this playing journey and I'm absolutely loving this instrument (ukulele) and more specifically this Mango wood Pono. Because UAS is real, while I learn and play, I'm going to start researching and looking out for my next ukulele. Do I "need" another one? No, but I want one.

So help me out and make some recommendations. Just to recap, here's what I'm playing.

Pono MGTD (All solid mango, tenor, gloss finish) with fluorocarbon strings (high G tuning).

What am I targeting? Some criteria.
Size: tenor
Price: negotiable, but not opposed to as high as $800

I'm specifically looking for something that will give me a different feel, sound, tone than the Pono mango. I'd like to have a discussion about different woods, types of music and strings to help make a good choice. I guess I'm looking for something just as nice sounding and beautiful, but different (if that makes sense).

I've been peeking through TUS and here are a few models that jumped out at me (open to any other suggestions).

Pono Cedar/Rosewood Tenor (RT(C) PC Pro Classic
Pono Cedar Top Acacia Deluxe Tenor ATD-CR
Kala KA-ZTP-CTG Cedar Ziricote Tenor (I know this is laminate, but the look is nice!)

That should get us started! Hit me!

Edit: I'm not looking to buy right now, but just getting the research going.
Hi Weatherman! Anuenue AMM3 Mahogany, $699 - 729.00 TUS. I have one and the sound is like none of my others. Warm, deep, rich. At first I was a little intimidated by the slotted headstock for restringing. But, Piece of Cake! I have UKE Logic hard tension with Low wound G....yah yah! Perfect combo. I pick it, I strum it and at times I go all out crazy and heavy on it. A sound all its own. And yeah, that great SMELL!! (Hey Tim!)
 
Interesting discussion all the way around. I paid a good amount for my violin but at the time was playing for dances on an almost weekly basis. My celtic harps are pricey too but it is the nature of the beast. I have, however, been very happy with my midrange ukuleles and enjoy them no less for that. They are reasonable purchases and give back so much more. That being said, to me mahogany and mango are mellower sounding woods. Maple has a clear transparent sound but no punch. Spruce, cedar and Port Orford Cedar will have a greater attack with cedar being the warmest sound of the bunch. I don't necessarily agree that with owning one Pono, all others will sound alike. Top woods vary the voicing of the instrument. I also like all solid because I am a wood snob. It's a fun journey. For your point of reference, the favorites in my personal collection include a Rebel concert double creme brulee (mango), Martin tenor Streetmaster T1 ( mahogany) and an Ohana tenor Port Orford cedar/myrtle , TK-80. My classical guitar is a cedar top and cedar is always a beautiful sounding wood.
 
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