Uke design pet peeves

I had a Romero concert that had a round protuberance on the back of the headstock where the neck met the headstock. It was like a wood marble was placed there. Unfortunately it was right where my thumb wanted to be 90% of the time and it drove me nuts. That was one issue among others which caused me to sell it.
Well? My advice is to take charge and attack it with sandpaper if it happens again!
 
Martin’s annoying tendency to leave the nut edges square, making them uncomfortable to play some 1st position chords. Why? Why? A few seconds with a file solves the problem, yes, but that’s a basic design/QC feature. Argh.
I agree, had to take a file to those sharp edges on a T1K, S1 and OXK.
 
Tie bar bridges. I can’t help but think they look cheap (not all of them, but most) and often they are too big/wide. Even though I know how to use them, I find slot bridges much easier and look better.
I much prefer the aesthetic of slot, through body or pin bridges. I really don't like the look of tie bar, I agree.
 
I'm a "wrap the thumb around the neck" player. I find ukes with the tuners placed too close to the nut highly annoying and sometimes unplayable.

Definitely not a fan of a lot of bling, but I'm not much looking at my uke while I play it!
 
I never tried a pin bridge in an ukulele, but would probably hate it.
I have slot bridge ukuleles. Looks good, but knots tend to slip through.

Tie bar bridges are the best. Fool prove, no nonsense, way to fasten strings. Doesnt slip through or pop pins out. If tied neatly, it looks like a fine oldschool classical guitar.

Just my preference, which I though should be out there next to those who dont like them 😆
 
Slotted headstocks.

I know a lot of people love them, and the very streamlined ones they put on high-end ukes can look good, but imo on a lot of cheaper ukuleles they’re too chunky and look ridiculous. Particularly on the smaller sizes. Seems to me that it’s just a pointless attempt to bolt guitar-like features onto a ukulele. Also, I’ve only had one uke with a slotted headstock and it made string changes a complete PITA.
 
Tie bars don't need to look bad or sloppy.

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I own only one uke with a tiebar bridge. I usually do the traditional knotting just so I remember how to do it. But it’s a tedious process (and can damage the bridge if done too often). I have some of those tieoff thingies and should use them on my next string change.
 
Slotted headstocks.
Yup.

I also agree with the bling factor comments, although the level of bling would of course be subjective. I am, however, a total fan of loud wood grain (not so much of spalting). Bring on the curl, medullary rays, birds eye, ripple, quilting, I like it! Although, I do like using the wood grain tastefully, I'd prefer not to have plaid, paisley and polka dots all on one instrument, as it were.

As a general rule, I am also not a huge fan of dyed wood. There are exceptions (e.g. I sometimes like Antics Ukuleleria's use of dyed wood binding), but I would far sooner see gorgeous wood grain choices vs dyed wood.
 
Even though Caesar said iacta alea est, the dye is cast...don't cast away all dyes. I have done tasteful things and gaudy things as well. I made a desk for my wife and I dyed it red. The wood grain was black but the background was a dark red...almost an ox-blood color. It was and is very elegant. On the other hand, I made myself a pipe and I dyed it yellow. The result was a bumble-bee effect with black wood grain and a yellow background.
 
I own only one uke with a tiebar bridge. I usually do the traditional knotting just so I remember how to do it. But it’s a tedious process (and can damage the bridge if done too often). I have some of those tieoff thingies and should use them on my next string change.
My first uke had a tie bar and figuring out how to do it was like I had been initiated into a secret club. But now that I know how to do it, it’s my favorite style of bridge. Nothing to pop off or pull through and in my opinion looks great. Not so great on a soprano, but now that I know how to do it, it’s my favorite style of bridge. Nothing to pop off or pull through and in my opinion looks great. Before all the comments, yes, I agree, they are not so great-looking on a soprano. In fact, I don’t think I’ve ever even seen that.
 
Even though Caesar said iacta alea est, the dye is cast...don't cast away all dyes. I have done tasteful things and gaudy things as well. I made a desk for my wife and I dyed it red. The wood grain was black but the background was a dark red...almost an ox-blood color. It was and is very elegant. On the other hand, I made myself a pipe and I dyed it yellow. The result was a bumble-bee effect with black wood grain and a yellow background.
You are correct it can be effective. It's just not usually my first choice.
 
wide nut widths/spacings...lol. actually, mfgers/shops not specifying those things is a little annoying and sometimes eliminates a sale (yeah, I can always get the nut remade/cut, but...). Koalohas (and cousin Rebel) are quite playable for me, btw.

too much inlay/bling for sure... looks cheap when overdone. rosette decals, etchings and fancy/cutesy markers (animals, flowers, stars, etc.); sometimes simple or even none is better.

fat necks, pale bridges and fretboards that don't match well, wonkily installed/crooked tuners (but that's almost all if you look closely), gold bits (give it a gloss finish and gold tuners and let's call it "deluxe"!)...

I'm a lefty but play righty; if I played left I'd be annoyed with side dots only on the righty side.
Amen to all of it!
 
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