Useful thing: UG free live chord chart

doctorapatite

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It is good to learn chords in the context of music theory, what they mean, why they are shaped the way they are, etc. But sometimes you just want to look up a chord you've forgotten, or one you've never heard of. When my eldest started ukulele we bought a paper chart but when I started playing I figured out a better way: Using Ultimate Guitar tabs as chord charts. I'm probably not the first to think of this but I searched UU and didn't see it mentioned so here goes. Hope this helps.

Here's a pre-made version: https://tabs.ultimate-guitar.com/tab/lessons-scales/g-c-e-a-ukulele-chords-ukulele-5147725 But because UG requires saved tabs be of a certain length, this one is longer and more confusing.

It's better to make your own that is shorter, more useful, and still has all the same info. I hesitate to provide a link for an unpublished tab because it will disappear if I close my account but for as long as it is here, this is what you are shooting for: https://tabs.ultimate-guitar.com/user/tab/view?h=G3iB0p7qqYO-Wx4fpBH_tRaj

Here's how to make your own. Go to https://www.ultimate-guitar.com/, click on +PUBLISH TAB and paste a list of chords such as this:

C Cm C5 C7 Cmaj7 Cm7 Csus Csus2 Csus4 C7sus C7sus4 C9sus C/E C/B Cadd2 Cadd9 Cadd11 Cmadd9 C6 Cm6 C9 Cm9 Cmaj9 C11 C13 Cm13 Cdim Cdim7 Caug C7#5 Cm7#5 Cm7+5 C7#9 C7b9

into the main tab text window, then under type choose "ukulele". Save as personal and then click "view on site". You will probably need to make an account but you shouldn't need to pay unless they've changed something. It's been a while since I used UG for free.

Anyway, assuming that works, now you have a fake song that has many kinds of C family chords and their diagrams. Now click the +1 or -1 next to TRANSPOSE, and congratulations you have a bunch of C# or B chords. A few more transpositions and now you have EVERY chord, and it's much less confusing than having a list of every chord all at once like in my first example.

And under each one are little buttons that let you check out different versions of the chord. Sometimes there are more than a dozen different versions of each one. This will help you find one that is easier to play, or sounds better for the song you are trying to play, or spices up the song, or whatever. I am left-handed, and I play right-handed instruments upside down, so what is easier for me is not necessarily easier for a right-handed person. So I usually have to scroll past the first few options to find one that works for me. For example, #3 of 14 is my favorite E chord (it's a barre for me):
Screenshot 2024-02-15 at 9.05.41 PM.png
Anyway I hope this is useful for someone. Please let me know if anyone sees any errors in my instructions (or any missing chords).
 
Discounting whether or not it is useful to others, making chord charts is a very valuable tool for your own development. When you take the time to put this info together, you absorb so much by osmosis. I remember sitting at a bar with graph paper and sketching out chords 'til I couldn't see straight--and I don't know if that was from the overload of information or from the Old Rasputin imperial stouts.
 
Discounting whether or not it is useful to others, making chord charts is a very valuable tool for your own development. When you take the time to put this info together, you absorb so much by osmosis. I remember sitting at a bar with graph paper and sketching out chords 'til I couldn't see straight--and I don't know if that was from the overload of information or from the Old Rasputin imperial stouts.
Yep, when you realize that the same shapes are appearing over and over again it's a real game changer, allowing you to play chords all the way up and down the fretboard. It took a while for it to sink in, but it made a big difference in how I play.
 
Yep, when you realize that the same shapes are appearing over and over again it's a real game changer, allowing you to play chords all the way up and down the fretboard. It took a while for it to sink in, but it made a big difference in how I play.
Exactly, I have all the chords on one sheet of paper.

I suppose I should share how I did it, in case there's an interest. For every chord quality in which I have an interest (m7, m6, m9, m add9, maj7, half-diminished, 13, m11, sus2, sus4, and minor) I found 4 shapes. A shape for the root on each string. All the shapes are moveable so that greatly cut down on my memorization. I only have to memorize 4 shapes for all keys of a chord quality versus learning 12 separate shapes for all the keys. That's why all those chords fit on one piece of paper.

Oh, by the way, you may have noticed that most of those chord qualities are minor. That's because I consider minors to be the natural sound and major is just a mutation, but I do notate which finger to sharpen to get the major. So actually my compact little chord chart has almost twice the chords; I just don't usually acknowledge the major aberrations
 
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Yes not only is this file printable but then you can cut and paste that to you heart's content, which no pre-made poster will allow!
 
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