Using a thumb pic

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What's the advantage/disadvantage of using a thumb pick on a uke? I've never played with one but am curious about it. As a finger-picker, it seems like it would overpower the other fingers. I've watched some videos where it is used am see it can be done effectively.
 
I've seen a few players who can use a thumb pick on an ukulele (mostly on Low G Tenors) and not overpower the other strings. Most people, myself included, can't do it properly.
 
It definitely takes practice, but they’re cheap and worth checking out. They always wear out the skin on my thumb so I can never use them long enough to get used to them, but it does add a more articulated G sound to the mix.
 
Anything can be achieved with practice. I have learnt how to rein in my low G. Some people have metal strings and they learn how to regulate them. So the thumb pick is within your power. You could even get those fingertip picks for the other fingers. You'd look a bit like Edward Scissorhands but at least there would be a level playing field for all the fingers
 
What's the advantage/disadvantage of using a thumb pick on a uke? I've never played with one but am curious about it. As a finger-picker, it seems like it would overpower the other fingers. I've watched some videos where it is used am see it can be done effectively.
You might experiment with Fred Kelly Light Slick Picks. They are considerably smaller than typical guitar picks and are easy to clip/file to length/shape.

<edit> See updated pic in reply #15
 

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You might experiment with Fred Kelly Light Slick Picks. They are considerably smaller than typical guitar picks and are easy to clip/file to length/shape.
Fred Kelly makes the best thumb picks, hands-down (nice folks, too).

But you bring up a good point: ANY thumb pick can be filed down to a size that works for you. Just remember to take it slow when you’re filing. It’s easy to take stuff off but a real pain to put stuff back on. ;-)
 
Brittni Pavia is a thumb pick user:



I've not bothered with them on uke because I don't struggle to get any power out of the low end. I do use one on occasion with a steel string guitar to give my bass notes a bit more oomph when required. Sound great when combined with a light palm mute Tommy Emmanuel style. Shame I can't play even a quarter as well as he can :D
 
Brittni Pavia is a thumb pick user:



I've not bothered with them on uke because I don't struggle to get any power out of the low end. I do use one on occasion with a steel string guitar to give my bass notes a bit more oomph when required. Sound great when combined with a light palm mute Tommy Emmanuel style. Shame I can't play even a quarter as well as he can :D

Dang, I could listen to that all day!
 
As always, this community comes through. Thank you for the thoughts and videos. Very helpful and encouraging. Will give em a go!
 
The player that comes to mind with a thumb pick is Herb Ohta, Jr. Plays Hawaiian music with a lot of fingerpicking and is a well known top performer.
I regularly see Aaron Keim use a thumb pick in the YouTube videos of him.
 
I like using just my fingers to play uke. A pick is a bit...impersonal. Like wearing a raincoat in the sea.

I do use one when playing death metal guitar, but that's a LITTLE different. I'd deglove my fingers if I tried playing without one.
 
The angle you hold and move your thumb is very different with a thumb pick.
I find that cutting and filing the pick so it is a short extension of the side of your thumb minimizes this. See "yellow" pics in reply #5 (above).

<edit> Use a finger/toenail clipper to rough shape it, then a small sanding block (or drywall "sponge block") for final shape.

<edit 2> After re-reading Neil_O's comment, I took another Fred Kelly Light and shaped its angle to extend toward the nut.
It's much easier to use, now. (I am a right-handed strummer.)
 

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Based on this thread and the posts from Wiggy and LukuleleStrings, I ordered a variety pack of Fred Kelly picks (directly from them - package came with 17 picks). I tried the bumblebee jazz and the speed among others, but like the slick pick. Why? Because my playing adjusted very quickly to using them. I am a thumb picker and strummer and did with the slick pick I did not have to change very much to comfortably play my chord melody without having to look at the pick placement. Its use makes the strings ring out louder and stronger and allow me to continue when my thumb issues would have me quit otherwise.
 
Sorry for detail...

I sometimes get wrong associations when "pick" is spelled differently.

To me, "pic" is short for picture, and since the are pictures called thumbnails of "thumb" for short, I imagined it was about those.

Still, it was more unfortunate when I looked at the webpage of the finger pick company "Alaska". They spell it Alaska-"pik". That means something quite different in danish. You know, like... "pecker". It was hard to read their size guide, where they suggesting finding your "pik" size based on your glove size.
It said that "small glove = small pik".
Hard not to giggle...
 
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