Violin style friction tuners

nice...was that going to be a cigar box uke?
Not this one. I did build a concert size CBU with a similar peghead and Grover friction tuners, as well as a baritone with a similar peghead and UPT-L tuners.
 
Graham- You really take this stuff serious. I did not realize posting on the forum was something I had to be so careful about, so as not to raise the ire of the masses. I have deleted the post. You should delete your post, which repeats mine, so that the masses of uke builders do not become enraged over my trangressions. Should I ever post again, I'll be much more selective about what I say. Enjoy your building.
 
I own an RS Williams banjo, made in Southern Ontario. It was in poor shape when I got it, but I had it restored by my friend, Teilhard Frost. It now has a goat head, Nylgut strings and wooden violin style tuning pegs. They gave me a bit of trouble at first, but a bit of fiddle resin helped to stop them from slipping out of tune.

RSWilliams delivered a.jpg RSWilliams delivered b.jpg
 
Ken Timms made five 'Island style' sopranos with tapered pegs, as described above ten years ago. I have played two of them and they are delightful little things. The tuners are something you have to get used to but, once set, they hold tune really well. Tapered wooden pegs are not a problem provided you frown, grit your teeth, stick your bottom lip out and persevere.
 
Ken Timms made five 'Island style' sopranos with tapered pegs, as described above ten years ago. I have played two of them and they are delightful little things. The tuners are something you have to get used to but, once set, they hold tune really well. Tapered wooden pegs are not a problem provided you frown, grit your teeth, stick your bottom lip out and persevere.
So not for the heavily botoxed, edental and impatiemt among us then?
Duly noted
 
I am a fan of wooden pegs. They were used from time immoral. I got carried away and bought numerous sets from 1/4 violin to 1/2 cello, plus a large collection of various small pegs. I also purchased 2 reamers and a 2 sized peg shaver. At 81 I'm down-sizing and will entertain all offers of those who are interested in all or part.
 
I did a little experiment, and I think my hypothesis is correct. I set up a dummy headstock and neck, and made multiple peg holes of varying angle in relation to the face of the headstock. Then strung up with identical strings and basically matching pegs.

With the peg more perpendicular to the fretboard (and not the face of the headstock), the peg is much easier to turn and stays in place better.

Here's a photo.... The peg on the far side is the one that works better. The near peg is more what I would think is the traditional angle.
peg-angles.jpg
 
I did a little experiment, and I think my hypothesis is correct. I set up a dummy headstock and neck, and made multiple peg holes of varying angle in relation to the face of the headstock. Then strung up with identical strings and basically matching pegs.

With the peg more perpendicular to the fretboard (and not the face of the headstock), the peg is much easier to turn and stays in place better.

Here's a photo.... The peg on the far side is the one that works better. The near peg is more what I would think is the traditional angle.
View attachment 172156
I’ve never used friction pegs, and have no plans to either, but I do find that very interesting.
Thanks for the experiment and posting the results.
 
With the peg more perpendicular to the fretboard (and not the face of the headstock), the peg is much easier to turn and stays in place better.
Would the strings ride up the peg over time follow least resistance, affecting tune?
 
Would the strings ride up the peg over time follow least resistance, affecting tune?
Good question... I don't think so, at least not over time but maybe a little at first. I'm thinking there will still be enough friction and tension to prevent that being a problem.
 
My sense of what looks 'right' would only allow me to fit the pegs perpendicular to the face of the headstock. ;)
I hear ya...it does look a little funky. I'm going to try this on on new soprano uke that is something of an experiment itself overall. The good thing is, something like this being off can easily be fixed and hidden.
 
interesting... a basic and dumb question, but do the pegs turn with the same resistance prior to fitting strings? i.e., is their baseline the same? or, is the difference due solely to the angle or are there other factors at play? what would happen if the pegs are swapped in the different holes? same result?
 
They have the equivalent of a thicker headstock and more friction material when angled (i.e. the new trial ones)... so perhaps that means they can be proportionately less tight and the extra area equalises some of the internal inconsistencies - grain and so on? Perhaps you should try an even steeper angle, after all the parallel-to-fretboard makes b.all difference other than to our organisational minds, as there is nut (with a particular friction) which is the only thing they 'know about', so to speak?
 
I'm guessing it's all due to the "pull" of the string. Straight on, the pull is equal top to bottom, but since the peg is tapered, the pull actually increases towards the bottom of the peg and gives it a tendency to want to pop out the back (bad). However if the angle is compensated for the taper just enough by angling back towards the pulling force, the pull is more at the top of the peg, which naturally holds it in and reduces the amount of friction needed to keep it in place. That's my theory anyway.
 
My head hurts! I've only built one uke (a soprano) with tapered wooden pegs but it turned out just fine. I know it looks a bit (or a lot) clunky but I carved the pegs by hand and eye - including the taper - and made the tapered holes with one side of a pair of scissors, shaped into a tapered cutting tool.

It was very time consuming.Tapered Wooden Pegs - 2011.jpg
 
Respect. Beautiful mini versions of what Fred and Barney hit each other with!
 
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