what are you reading?

'The History of Jazz', by Ted Gioia. I think someone here suggested it in another thread.
 
Cold Mountain. About a quarter of the way through. Good so far. About a hundred songs could be lifted from the pages, as many paragraphs can stand on their own.

I want to read it before I watch the DVD
 
I just finished The Sun Down Motel. It’s a great book if you’re looking for a Stephen King kind of story that’s got a fresh take on the subject matter.

Now I’m reading Scavenger Hunt by Christopher Pike and The Claiming of Sleeping Beauty by Anne Rice.
 
Cold Mountain. About a quarter of the way through. Good so far. About a hundred songs could be lifted from the pages, as many paragraphs can stand on their own.

I want to read it before I watch the DVD
I really enjoyed both! I think they did a pretty good job in the movie, but I loved the beautiful imagery that the author develops in the novel.
 
Right now, I'm comparing two versions of Popol Vuh... the creation myth of southern Mexico and Guatemala... I'm considering writing a play script from this material... doing a little research and to see if this is feasible.
 
Ecclesiastes. At age 57, I’ve made a commitment to read the Bible cover to cover. Having repeatedly slogged through the first few books of “begat-ing”, I began the summer with Deutoronomy. Thus far, Esther was the book I most enjoyed. She was a true heroine, courageous, cunning and righteous.

My inspiration was an exchange between archaeologists in James Michener’s historical novel “The Source”. During a late night 1960’s conversation while encamped at the fictional Tell Makor, an Israeli archaeologist challenges his friend and co-worker, an Irish Catholic archaeologist, that, to gain a genuine understanding of Judaism, he should read the Book of Deuteronomy five times.

Though I don’t claim to have acquired sudden expertise in that manner, the late, great Mr. Michener knew a thing or two about the Bible, the Torah, the Talmud and the Quran. In a different novel, “Centennial”, he also shared extensive knowledge of the Book of Mormon.
 
Ecclesiastes. At age 57, I’ve made a commitment to read the Bible cover to cover. Having repeatedly slogged through the first few books of “begat-ing”, I began the summer with Deutoronomy. Thus far, Esther was the book I most enjoyed. She was a true heroine, courageous, cunning and righteous.

My inspiration was an exchange between archaeologists in James Michener’s historical novel “The Source”. During a late night 1960’s conversation while encamped at the fictional Tell Makor, an Israeli archaeologist challenges his friend and co-worker, an Irish Catholic archaeologist, that, to gain a genuine understanding of Judaism, he should read the Book of Deuteronomy five times.

Though I don’t claim to have acquired sudden expertise in that manner, the late, great Mr. Michener knew a thing or two about the Bible, the Torah, the Talmud and the Quran. In a different novel, “Centennial”, he also shared extensive knowledge of the Book of Mormon.

I read through the bible also when I was younger... follow it up with The Gnostic Gospel by Elaine Pagels... amazing retake on the Gospels from the original source materials.

Spoiler alert: Lots of dirty bits are coming up soon!
 
I read through the bible also when I was younger... follow it up with The Gnostic Gospel by Elaine Pagels... amazing retake on the Gospels from the original source materials.

Spoiler alert: Lots of dirty bits are coming up soon!
Will do. Thanks for the guidance.
 
I just finished Work Won’t Love You Back (a book about late capitalism and how it’s common for businesses to gaslight employees into taking lower wages by using terms like “we’re a family.”) and it was pretty interesting.

I also read Book Lovers and that was fantastic! If you like romance, that’s a great one!

I read The Claiming of Sleeping Beauty, which I did not like at all. I won’t deride what some of my women friends call *ROMANCE* while they blink their eyes like they’re doing Morse code (another friend interpreted for me that it was code for smut) but this particular book’s spicy stuff wasn’t for me. It opened with a SA and then it was all humiliation and so. Much. Spanking.

Finally, I read Gwendy’s Magic Feather (book 2 of the Gwendy trilogy) and it was a fun time. I liked it quite a bit.

Now I’m reading Stephen King’s Fairy Tale. I’m about 20% in and enjoying it a lot.
 
Will do. Thanks for the guidance.
bbkobabe- I should have picked up on the fact that "lots of dirty bits" would be Song of Solomon. Certainly a stark departure from the war, slavery, patience, bloodshed, suffering and redemption of the preceding books. I chose to read on through the 1st chapter of Isaiah in an unsuccessful effort to get the grapes off my mind. Not surprised that I've never heard any reference to SOS during a Baptist sermon.
 
Gender Queer, 1st in my en-devour to read all the banned books.
 
The elderly but, other that a few "salty passages", it wouldn't hurt the High School Seniors either.
Depending on whose definition you use, I'm already a senior citizen or will be one in a few years which is kind of a jarring realization. :oops:
I see Water For Elephants on the used book store shelves all the time so there must have been a lot of people reading it. I've seen it so often it has me wondering if there is a copy somewhere around the house. I've never read it but may have to put it on my "someday" list. My "to read" pile is getting out of hand. I've been picking up a lot of books at Goodwill and other thrift stores. If you were to stack them the pile would literally be about 5' high!
 
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