what are you reading?

Just checked out the autobio of Mel Brooks called All About Me! Of course it is, Mel!

I had so much fun reading Eric Idle's really entertaining Bio I thought I'd try another. Included in that tome is the story of Always look on the bright side of life... Which is really fun to play on the ukulele. *

* (Gratitius but relevant tie-in for unsuspecting or lost UU's)
 
bbkobabe- I should have picked up on the fact that "lots of dirty bits" would be Song of Solomon. Certainly a stark departure from the war, slavery, patience, bloodshed, suffering and redemption of the preceding books. I chose to read on through the 1st chapter of Isaiah in an unsuccessful effort to get the grapes off my mind. Not surprised that I've never heard any reference to SOS during a Baptist sermon.

Right... Especially at Teen Bible classes. Those kids are already all over each other in the back parking lot as soon as class ends... no reason to encourage them further...
 
Gender Queer is my kid Maia's memoir on emerging as gender neutral... Try it if you like!
I might! I bought it because I wanted to read a lot of interviews to see the consistencies/inconsistencies between the kids. All of them were British so there was definitely a difference between their local cultures and what my oldest (who is non-binary) has been experiencing.
 
I might! I bought it because I wanted to read a lot of interviews to see the consistencies/inconsistencies between the kids. All of them were British so there was definitely a difference between their local cultures and what my oldest (who is non-binary) has been experiencing.
Might be available at the library... although the bans on the book here in America are starting to take a toll, making it less available...

This book of grounded in California, though it tells a story true for kids everywhere, these days. Gender inquiry is the question of our times, it seems.
 
I just finished George Harrison: Behind The Locked Door by Graeme Thomson. If I had to choose a favorite Beatle it would probably be George Harrison. I think that his religious views aside, I found him the most relatable. I thought that this biography was excellent. I'm not a fan of fawning puff pieces and this was a warts and all account of his life. I've read a lot about the Beatles over the years but I didn't find this to be a slog through a bunch of stuff I already knew.
 
just started Love Stories, by Trent Dalton.
basically, a fella sat down at a makeshift card table at the insersection
of two main streets in the city of Brisbane, Australia w/ a sign out front
and listened to people talk about their lives in the context of what love means to them.
1/4 way through and you guessed it, i'm in love w/ it. ❤️
 
The best book I ever read was 'The Perfect Machine', by Richard Florence... the story of the building of the Hale 200" telescope at Mt. Palomar. It's the history of Hale- who spearheaded this one- as well as the 60 & 100" refractors at the Mt, Wilson Observatory- as well as the 102 cm refractor at the new Yerkes Observatory,. All 3 of these observatories became the largest in the world at the time.
He accomplished this while dealing with severe neurological issues that at times forced him to lock himself away in dark places for months at a time.
It was kind of like if one person built the Eiffel Tower, the Golden Gate Bridge and the Statue of Liberty in his lifetime.
If you're interested in engineering triumphs, this is the book for you.
 
just started Love Stories, by Trent Dalton.
basically, a fella sat down at a makeshift card table at the insersection
of two main streets in the city of Brisbane, Australia w/ a sign out front
and listened to people talk about their lives in the context of what love means to them.
1/4 way through and you guessed it, i'm in love w/ it. ❤️
My wife has a friend she's known since high school who is a videographer as a hobby/side gig and he did a similar thing in the streets of New York where he would offer free advice to those willing to speak with him. It was geared toward being entertaining but it was still interesting as I would imagine your book is. He did a lot of goofy things on video. He once took his infant twins out for a stroll and was telling people that he rented them for the afternoon from a new store called "Babies & Such". In another video he was seeking out a new gym membership and invited one of the female gym employees to feel his abs. Then he asked her to feel a lower spot on his abs and then said, "See, the lower you go, the harder it gets!" His sense of humor wasn't exactly PC. He was/is attractive and very charming so he seems to get away with a lot one might not tolerate with others. 😄
 
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Sophie’s Choice by William Styron. So far the story is very compelling, but the first-person narrative voice is annoying.
 
The Power of Habit: Why We Do What We Do in Life and Business by Charles Duhigg
This is on my TBR list. I like books like this.

I just finished Stephen King’s “Fairy Tale,” and thought it was a good book - definitely his best fantasy book that I’ve read. In other instances where he wants to pay homage to classic authors like Lovecraft he would try to write AS Lovecraft so this book feels more mature where he stays in his own wheelhouse and incorporates the stuff he wants to pay homage to rather than try to write as the authors he likes.

A character also said an RL Stine book was super dumb and I thought that was HILARIOUS.

Now I’m reading Jennette McCurdy’s “I’m Glad My Mom Died,” which has so many different levels of trauma that it feels like there’s something for everyone, but in the worst way.
 
My own botched attempt at a fantasy novel right now.
 
Working my way through Ian Rankin's Rebus series. I'm on Set in Darkness right now. I like how the Rebus character becomes more complex as the series progresses, and Rankin writes a good story.
 
Finished McCurdy’s book. Now I’m on to The Lost For Words Bookshop.

I’m a sucker for stories about bookshops. ;-)
 
It’s years since I read it last, but Mirrorshades: the Cyberpunk Anthology is back on my radar after the original authors decided to put it online to read for free. It’s hosted at Rudy Rucker’s website. Somewhere in storage is my old paperback copy, but since I can’t lay my hands on it immediately I ran the HTML through Calibre to turn the web version into an ebook, which is much easier for me to read.
 
I just finished Work Won’t Love You Back (a book about late capitalism and how it’s common for businesses to gaslight employees into taking lower wages by using terms like “we’re a family.”) and it was pretty interesting.

I also read Book Lovers and that was fantastic! If you like romance, that’s a great one!

I read The Claiming of Sleeping Beauty, which I did not like at all. I won’t deride what some of my women friends call *ROMANCE* while they blink their eyes like they’re doing Morse code (another friend interpreted for me that it was code for smut) but this particular book’s spicy stuff wasn’t for me. It opened with a SA and then it was all humiliation and so. Much. Spanking.

Finally, I read Gwendy’s Magic Feather (book 2 of the Gwendy trilogy) and it was a fun time. I liked it quite a bit.

Now I’m reading Stephen King’s Fairy Tale. I’m about 20% in and enjoying it a lot.

Oh God, I hate this modern genre of submission-lit for women. Where's the novels about dominant women? I would kill for a series about a Christine Grey, but I think I'm probably going to have to write one myself.
 
Have time to read the newspaper now and then. Yeah, I actually get a print newspaper ! Just read the parts I like. Outdoors section on Sunday is the best. Have not had the time to read a book in many years. Maybe again some day.

Occasionally read a menu in a restaurant on a rare occasion - but usually not. Never have my glasses along and in the last two years can count on one hand the number of times I ate out.
 
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