what are you reading?

Same here. We haven’t had a TV for many years
Well, my family watches Great British Bakeoff on the internet, but I retire to my room when that happens.

As Groucho Marx once said: "I find television very educating. Every time somebody turns on the set, I go into the other room and read a book".
 
Well, I jettisoned this one after 40 pp. Unbearably dull. Life is too short.


Same here. We haven’t had a TV for many years. Even when we had TVs we never watched (except for election returns and extreme weather activity) because it ate into our reading time.
So, not all men called Ove are as engaging as the rest.
 
I quit watching TV or any video back when I was in my twenties... that was... er... a long LONG time ago. Just don't have the time for that. I'm too busy reading!

I think we've established that we're ALL old here. :ROFLMAO: Which means that you're old enough to remember when shows like The Twilight Zone were airing an average of 30 episodes a season (36 in seasons 1 and 5), same as I Love Lucy (30 eps in 6 seasons). Lucy and her husband produced Star Trek, which averaged 26 (a total of 79 eps in 3 seasons), as well as the Mission Impossible TV series, whose first season had 28 episodes.

That's my only point. A couple of dozen books in a series is nowhere near obsessive. This exact amount of time spread over a couple of seasons been the definition of "regularly scheduled" for decades. :)

But yeah, these days I spend a LOT more time reading than watching TV too!
 
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A bit of holiday reading for me, the story of the Conway brothers and The Captain Matchbox Whoopee Band. Just the thing if you're into 1920s American music performed by a 1970s Australian jug band with a vaudeville flair and a homemade comedy aesthetic.
 
I think we've established that we're ALL old here. :ROFLMAO: Which means that you're old enough to remember when shows like The Twilight Zone were airing an average of 30 episodes a season (36 in seasons 1 and 5), same as I Love Lucy (30 eps in 6 seasons). Lucy and her husband produced Star Trek, which averaged 26 (a total of 79 eps in 3 seasons), as well as the Mission Impossible TV series, whose first season had 28 episodes.

That's my only point. This is nowhere near obsessive. It's been the definition of "regularly scheduled" for decades. :)

But yeah, these days I spend a LOT more time reading than watching TV too!
The only way to win is to not play,,, ;)
 
Earlier talk of book series reminded me of a series I forgot to mention, Elmore Leonard's Raylan Givens. I just finished Raylan (A Novel). I don't know if I would call this a novel. It seemed like this was a collection of three independent short stories that were loosely stitched together to make it long enough for a short book. (263 pages) The three stories themselves read to me like they were the outline or foundation for what could have/should have been longer stories, none of them satisfyingly complete. Two characters we know well from the TV series appeared in this book, Boyd Crowder and Dewey Crowe. This book really made me appreciate how good the TV series was. The show breathed so much more life and light into those characters, the book counterparts seeming a bit lifeless, flat and dull in comparison. Despite being somewhat disappointing it was still a quick and enjoyable read. I'd give it 3/5.
 
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@Canada Jim recently posted a cartoon in @Nickie 's great "Today's Chuckle" thread. It hilariously linked apes to a certain ex-US-president's book, "The Art Of The Deal".

Because I'd found a few business-oriented authors enjoyable, twice in the past decade I gave my best effort to finishing Trump's [in]famous book. My hope of gaining helpful pointers remained unsatisfied because the entire book revolves around multi-million-dollar apartment building and hotel deals, how he and his 'organization' borrowed the money to leverage each of them and how tough the various bankers were [which of course remained true until evidence of a decade of "liar loans" surfaced in late 2008].

There were none of the grass-roots takeaways such as those doled out decades ago by envelope magnate Harvey Mackay in "How To Swim With The Sharks Without Getting Eaten Alive": "Buy cheap cars and expensive houses", nor a single syllable achieving anything close to the entertainment value in virtually every page of Tom Wolfe's fictional, "A Man In Full". As much as I wish it weren't true, it's possible to gain far more useful life and business skills by reading SunTzu's "The Art of War".

If nonfiction scandal and scandalous behavior interests you, I recommend a 2000 nonfiction book that may be out of print: Whirlwind: The Butcher Banking Scandal by former Knoxville (Tennessee, USA) Sentinel reporter Sandra Lea. I would never have learned of Ms. Lea's book if not for a recommendation by my late and long-retired high school history teacher whose East Tennessee family lost its life savings as a result of the 1970's banking scams of C.H. Butcher, Jr and his politically- connected brother Jake.
 
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Just finished The It Girl, by Ruth Ware, a murder mystery. It’s good enough, I suppose. But so formulaic. Seems like mysteries these days are written according to a pattern: some kind of prologue stuff, then the murder, then flash ahead to X months or years later for a chapter of the present, then back to X months or years before the murder, then pick up where the present left off, then back to pick up where the past left off, in alternating chapters. So the “past” chapters eventually catch up to the time of the murder just as the “present” chapters are accumulating the revelations, and the person who’s glommed on to the truth encounters the perp and is in danger him- or herself.

Often I get homesick for the good old linear narratives, with Nero Wolfe and Poirot and Miss Marple and Miss Silver and Peter Wimsey and the rest.
 
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I’m now in the midst of Straight Man, by Richard Russo, and loving it. Finally, a literate comic novel by a master (actually, this is not a recent novel, since it was written in 1997, but if you ain’t read it, it ain’t stale, right?).

It’s about a 50-year-old English professor at a lesser state university in Pennsylvania. Henry is the “straight man” of the title because he can’t stop making jokes and goading everyone he works with, even his bosses.

The book is very funny and very well done. It reminds me of another comic novel set in academe, Lucky Jim, by Kingsley Amis, and I suspect it’s a homage to that book, because the protagonist of this one is sometimes referred to as “Lucky Hank.”
 
Silent To The Bone by E.L. Konigsburg,
from the primary school library where i work.

There is a thing that the 2 main characters like to do called SIAS, which means Summarise In A Sentence.

My SIAS of this book, after 60 pages out of 261 is:

A boy tries to get his friend to communicate using flash cards because his friend stopped talking completely after being accused of hurting his step baby sister.
 
Just finished the audio version of Diablo Mesa, one of the recent collaborations in the Special Agent Nora Kelly series by Lincoln Child and Douglas Preston. In the final two chapters, for the first time in the series, a character from the unrelated Jack Reacher series appears, which I found simultaneously pleasant and mentally jarring.
I didn't view that as a spoiler alert because the character played an inconsequential though completely relevant and believable role in neatly wrapping up the story line:).
 
The Halloween season had me wanting to read something creepy and supernatural - I just finished Necroscope by Brian Lumley.
A necroscope, check. A necromancer, check. A vampire, check. Communicating dead, check. Blend those into a spy story where world powers are utilizing those with supernatural powers to serve as spies to serve their nation and you have a story! Thankfully the story wasn't political and focused on the spy game but rather the lives and doings of the adversaries of such. I really enjoyed this book and its world and liked it enough to buy the next three books of the series. I'm going to take a break from this series to finish off a couple of other series. Next in line is the third book in the YA skinjacker trilogy, Everfound.
 
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With the upcoming release of the "final song by The Beatles", I'm in Beatles mode. I'm about 2/3 done with the new book "George Harrison: The Reluctant Beatle" by Philip Norman. Disappointing that there is nothing really new in there so far, and while John and Paul are frequently mentioned, as expected, poor Ringo almost doesn't exist for much of it. (Sure, he wasn't in the band in the early days, but I found myself frequently trying to remind the author that it wasn't just John, Paul, and George in the band.)

Coming out on Nov. 14 is a book on Mal Evans. Fans of The Beatles know who he is. I listened to a podcast with the author the other day and am looking forward to this book. I've read other books by the author, (Kenneth Womack), and usually like his books.

Meanwhile, I'm looking forward to - and also dreading - the release of the Beatles track. I wasn't that thrilled with Free as a Bird, which plodded along, IMO, though Real Love was OK. With the new technology, though, they aren't limited by the old demo cassette that John had created long ago, and that gives me hope that this one might be good. But I'm dreading the possibility that it might be a disappointment. I'll know in less than a week, though!
 
I finished reading Silent To the Bone the other day. Easy read since it is considered a book for children.
I like the cover. It was painted by the author.
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I also like how she wrote about silence. When the boy's best friend stopped talking, he learned to pay more attention to how his friend communicated with his body language.

Here is a nice excerpt:
"Silence does for thinking what a suspension bridge does for space - it makes connections."
 
I’m just finishing up a classic 19th-century detective novel, The Moonstone, by Willkie Collins. I was surprised by the humor in it.

The story, about the theft of a fabulously valuable (and cursed) Indian diamond, unfolds in narratives by an old family retainer (the butler), a poor relation who’s an evangelistic spinster, the detective, and so on. And though the plot is serious (ruined lives, heartbreak, death), the narrations are often hilarious.

Today I’ll be starting If It Bleeds by Stephen King. My husband recommended it.
 
And Tango Makes Three, a delightful children's book about 2 boy penguins who hatch and raise their very own child. Very enjoyable, and enlightening book for kids. I got it to use as a prop for my Halloween Drag Queen costume, as it is banned in some schools, and drag queens reading to kids in public libraries is now illegal here.
Then I decided reading it would be a good idea. It was.
 
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