what are you reading?

Just got Outlive: The Science and Art of Longevity by Peter Attia.
I tend to be sceptical of books that seem to offer longevity "secrets", but this has been on the bestseller list for a while, so I thought I'd give it a try.
 
Great read so far. Well written play by play of a fictional scenario that can easily become nonfiction.
Highly recommended.
Thanks for the update. I just put a hold on the book, though it looks like it will be a long wait.
 
Half Brother by Kenneth Oppel.

This is a YA type of book... the protagonist is 14 as it opens... and he never fails to note the breasts of the girls around him which seems a bit cringey today. Published in 2010, so there are no cell phones and the High School-ers listen to records at parties. I'm sure my students would think of this as a really old book... and since it was written the year they were born I guess it is... for them!

The premise: A normal family with a university professor dad get a grant to try and raise a chimpanzee and teach it sign language in Western Canada. First it plays for laughs as they become the family with a baby chimp, but then the funding dries up they must send him away. Then the book finds it's emotional core.

About 4/5ths the way through... I had to suspend disbelief quite a few times already but I'm concerned about where we are heading. Well see...
 
Recently finished a book I had had on hold for many months, The Bee Sting, by Paul Murray. It’s long and complex and very well written, set in Ireland after the technology crash and populated by absorbing plots and characters.

But the ending left me furious! Seething! The reader hasn’t a clue to what has happened. All the various plot lines head toward each other like out-of-control freight trains, then the book simply stops and leaves the reader hanging. I hate being manipulated like this. Aaaaaarghhhh!

On a cheerier note, I’ve just finished The Running Grave, the seventh and most recent in the Cormoran Strike detective series by “Robert Galbraith” (pen name of J.K. Rowling). These books are delicious! The writing is brilliant and moving and funny. The plots are inspired—and even believable! And the main characters really grow on you, evolving gradually as the series progresses.

These MUST be read in order, because while distinct cases are investigated and wrapped up in each novel, there’s an overarching plot that unfolds from the first book through each succeeding novel and involves the personal lives of the two principals in the detective agency, Cormoran Strike and Robin Ellacott.

I can’t say enough about these books. So well done! Rowling says she envisions the series as 10 books or maybe more, so I have at least 3 to look forward to, but how can I wait? I started reading Jonathan Lethem’s Brooklyn Crime Novel, but it meandered around so much that I returned it.
 
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I didn't realize that there were that many books in the Cormoran Strike series! I read the first 3 and have the 4th, Lethal White, on my "to read" pile. I enjoy those books as well and look forward to those I haven't read yet.
 
I just finished Heart Shaped Box by Joe Hill. I thought it was a very good first novel and very much like something his father (Stephen King) would have written though I think Hill has his own voice. Of the three books of his that I've read (NOS4A2, 20th Century Ghosts), I like this one the best. I look forward to reading more of his work!
 
I just pulled out from the Colony Mars series after book 5, to dive into the just released Extinction by Doug Preston. It’s a page turner alright, and hard to put down. Mars can wait.
 
About to start on this biography of Wilson, Keppel and Betty:

IMG_7004.jpeg

And for those of you who have not had the, uh, pleasure…

 
I just started “Theodore Rex” by Edmund Morris. It’s the second volume of the Theodore Roosevelt trilogy. The first volume was very long but also very great. He was a great man and a great president. I’m looking forward to reading it.
 
The Stand. Newer edition with over 400 additional pages that were cut from the original release.
Who but Stephen King to add a book's worth of material to an already long book?! 😄 I've read The Stand 3-4 times and probably would have read it more if it weren't so long and I didn't have so many other books to read. I'm pretty sure at least one of those was the expanded edition but it's been years.
 
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I'm currently in the early stages of Before the Fall by Noah Hawley. I like what I've seen so far very, very much. Interesting, well-developed characters, an underlying mystery, and page-turning suspense. A highly recommended read!
 
Just finished a historical thriller Hour of the Witch by Chris Bohjalian. In Boston 1662, Mary is married to a powerful, cruel, abusive man. She seeks to divorce him in order to save her life but in a world where everyone is watching for signs of the devil, Mary soon becomes the object of suspicion and rumor. Now she not only seeks a divorce but must also fight to avoid the gallows under suspicion of being a witch. Overall I guess it was OK. It sagged in the middle and I think it could easily have been 75-100 pages shorter without compromising the story. I think the story pays off in the end so it wasn't disappointing but I did kind of have to push my way through a lot of it.
 
Just finished a YA novel, Virals by Kathy Reichs. This was the first book in a series and I enjoyed it. I was in it for the fun so I overlooked how everything in plot was fashioned to work out so neat and tidy. Exciting ending and good enough that I'd like to read more in the series.
 
Just wrapped up "The Stand". Might wade into the "Dark Tower" series next.
 
Just finishing up the "Korean Woman" (meh..) then I'll pick up the new Harlan Coben
 
Recently finished a book I had had on hold for many months, The Bee Sting, by Paul Murray. It’s long and complex and very well written, set in Ireland after the technology crash and populated by absorbing plots and characters.

But the ending left me furious! Seething! The reader hasn’t a clue to what has happened. All the various plot lines head toward each other like out-of-control freight trains, then the book simply stops and leaves the reader hanging. I hate being manipulated like this. Aaaaaarghhhh!

On a cheerier note, I’ve just finished The Running Grave, the seventh and most recent in the Cormoran Strike detective series by “Robert Galbraith” (pen name of J.K. Rowling). These books are delicious! The writing is brilliant and moving and funny. The plots are inspired—and even believable! And the main characters really grow on you, evolving gradually as the series progresses.

These MUST be read in order, because while distinct cases are investigated and wrapped up in each novel, there’s an overarching plot that unfolds from the first book through each succeeding novel and involves the personal lives of the two principals in the detective agency, Cormoran Strike and Robin Ellacott.

I can’t say enough about these books. So well done! Rowling says she envisions the series as 10 books or maybe more, so I have at least 3 to look forward to. I already want to replenish my shelves with new books. I'm also thinking about reading some classic science fiction. I haven’t really immersed myself in this genre yet, but recently I read more about the Frankenstein book and and I got hooked on the story. These were the free essay examples that my nephew used for his class work. But how can I wait? I started reading Jonathan Lethem’s Brooklyn Crime Novel, but it meandered around so much that I returned it.

I agree. I hate those kinds of endings in books or movies. No, I get it, the author wants to either leave some intrigue or let everyone think and decide for themselves. But at times like these, I feel cheated.
 
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So, after a breezy read of Tom Sawyer, I went straight into Huck Finn. Woah... I am quite surprised at how poorly I remember this book. What a story!

Yes, it's a bit hard hearing the N word 500 times... Like listening to modern Rap music... or the kids gaming together online and giving shoutouts.

Not what Twain intended, obviously. But... it makes me wonder: Was MT intending anything? Was this just the vernacular of his day? Was he making a statement of some sort?

Reading it again, probably for the third time now makes me ask: Why did it leave such a shallow impression on me?

Anyhow, I'm 3/4 the way through and should be able to finish is next week so I can return it to the school library!

WHAT? THIS BOOK IS IN A SCHOOL LIBRARY?!?!?! WHERE KIDS MIGHT SEE IT! :devilish: :devilish:
 
So, after a breezy read of Tom Sawyer, I went straight into Huck Finn. Woah... I am quite surprised at how poorly I remember this book. What a story!

Yes, it's a bit hard hearing the N word 500 times... Like listening to modern Rap music... or the kids gaming together online and giving shoutouts.

Not what Twain intended, obviously. But... it makes me wonder: Was MT intending anything? Was this just the vernacular of his day? Was he making a statement of some sort?

Reading it again, probably for the third time now makes me ask: Why did it leave such a shallow impression on me?

Anyhow, I'm 3/4 the way through and should be able to finish is next week so I can return it to the school library!

WHAT? THIS BOOK IS IN A SCHOOL LIBRARY?!?!?! WHERE KIDS MIGHT SEE IT! :devilish: :devilish:

I heard that Mark Twain was one of the first, if not the first, to write in the American vernacular of that time and place. His work needs to be respected for the historical accuracy that represents our nation. How else can we and future generations know what it was like.
 
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