What is an unpopular/controversial opinion you have regarding the ukulele?

therealsimon

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Hey all,

As the title says, what is a "hot take" or unpopular/controversial opinion you have about something related to the ukulele?

I'll start: Ukulele play-alongs on YouTube can be fun to watch/play along with, but these videos don't really show you how to get better at uke on your own, how to make your own arrangements, understand music theory, become a better musician, etc.

Simon
 
I agree with that.

My take: Large all ukulele groups where everyone is playing the same thing doesn't sound very interesting to listen to.
Agreed as well! Similar to the uke play-along videos, not a lot of variety and it seems in these massive jams, everyone is limited to playing what's on the sheet in front of them, often C, G7, F, and Am.

Not saying these are bad, just more variety and more effort into arranging should maybe be put? (Again, an unpopular opinion.)

Simon
 
I really do think we should be teaching thumb behind the headstock, just like classical guitar. It is not ergonomically sensible to put it around the neck like guitar. It just promotes bad left hand technique and chording. Once you become one with the instrument, and can play at a very high level, then you can deviate from that in a sort of “player’s choice” situation.
 
I have such a huge volume of controversial and unpopular views that it’s impossible to find a place to start. However, I love the ukulele!
Here’s a tangent: If a Seasonista posts a cover tune that you enjoy enough to post a thumbs- up or even a kind comment here at UUF, please post a comment on their YT channel.;)
 
I really do think we should be teaching thumb behind the headstock, just like classical guitar. It is not ergonomically sensible to put it around the neck like guitar. It just promotes bad left hand technique and chording. Once you become one with the instrument, and can play at a very high level, then you can deviate from that in a sort of “player’s choice” situation.
I think we shouldn't quite do classical guitar technique, but not what people are currently doing.

The proper way in my opinion is have the thumb BEHIND the neck, not around it. This allows for a lot of flexibility and reach on the fretboard as it allows the fingers to make an arch.
 
E major is not a hard chord to play. I think people often forget how much they struggled with chords like G when they first started out
I've never struggled with any barre chord, diminished chord, any chord other than E and augmented chords. What's easy for one player may be hard for another. We're all different.
 
I think Tiny Tim set the ukulele reputation as a legitimate instrument back at least 30 years.

When a friend invited me to come to a uke club meeting, my first response was, "That small toy Tiny Tim and Fred MacMurray played?"

I'm glad I went and found out my perception of ukuleles was so very wrong.
 
Here’s a tangent: If a Seasonista posts a cover tune that you enjoy enough to post a thumbs- up or even a kind comment here at UUF, please post a comment on their YT channel.;)

I'll jump on your tangent as a fellow Seasonista. I'm of two minds on this. One, no is obliged to listen to anything nor write a comment when just listening is already appreciated. And while I do enjoy reading other's thoughts on something I've created, I would much rather read a comment with some thoughts on the song / video vs just a generic "Nice bring."

Also semi-related: I've noticed some Seasonistas who never comment on anyone else's videos, but would reply only on their page. It's not too different from redditors who would only post their material online and never participate on other's stuff.
 
I think we shouldn't quite do classical guitar technique, but not what people are currently doing.

The proper way in my opinion is have the thumb BEHIND the neck, not around it. This allows for a lot of flexibility and reach on the fretboard as it allows the fingers to make an arch.
Correct. Not classical guitar, but derivative techniques of it.
 
I disagree, re: Tiny Tim. I do not claim he was a great ukulele player, but I certainly don't think he hurt the popularity of the instrument and he most definitely helped preserve The Early American Popular Music Songbook.

Tiny Tim was a walking encyclopedia of American pop music from the dawn of recording in the late 19th century through the era just prior to WW2.

Vaudeville, early hot jazz, torch songs, vocal jazz standards, the crooners, etc. Tim knew most everything about that stuff.

I came on here to say this and wasn't surprised to see him talked down some, and that's fine. It's understandable; just a different viewpoint.

But I think we should be happy that he chose to use the ukulele as the vehicle for his awkward, weird warbling.

He was a larger-than-life character. Unique in a way that is pretty much lost today.
 
Here's an unpopular one:
People who say Ookalaylee, when they are speaking English sound ridiculous. I can even hear it when they write. They call it "an" Ukulele. Ridiculous!!! Should only be pronounced that way by people fluent in Hawaiian...and I mean fluent. Otherwise, you sound silly.
 
Here's an unpopular one:
People who say Ookalaylee, when they are speaking English sound ridiculous. I can even hear it when they write. They call it "an" Ukulele. Ridiculous!!! Should only be pronounced that way by people fluent in Hawaiian...and I mean fluent. Otherwise, you sound silly.
While I get the sentiment, I think I disagree. The ‘ukulele is Hawaiian. Pronouncing it with the correct emphasis on vowels keeps it sounding Hawaiian from a cultural perspective. Is “grassy-ass” acceptable when saying thank you in Spanish, invoking Peggy Hill or some other uneducated (US) southerner? By that logic, everyone studying a foreign language should try to speak the foreign language correctly but with the most American (or other nationality) accent ever. (I’m pointing at [US] southern accents most here)

I think it’s the teacher in me that won’t let me accept this, if you know what I mean. I say the both the correct and incorrect pronunciation in class all the time, but I try to be cognizant and use the former when I can.
 
Unpopular take--strumming patters usually get in the way of people's progressing.
 
Agreed as well! Similar to the uke play-along videos, not a lot of variety and it seems in these massive jams, everyone is limited to playing what's on the sheet in front of them, often C, G7, F, and Am.

Not saying these are bad, just more variety and more effort into arranging should maybe be put? (Again, an unpopular opinion.)

Simon
Ouch!
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... for good reason.

<edit> "anything"m7b5 just blows my mind in a good way.

My point is, a 4-stringed instrument can make real or imagined things happen with more clarity than a full-blown orchestra.

(I need to make that my signature!)
 
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"Give me 4 potatoes."
Setting the pace and mood of a song is important. The rhythm should be a constant that can be varied for a purpose. A person trying to grasp rhythm while learning to sing along would benefit from simpler chord sequences and varied strum patterns.

If play & sing is your goal, you need to start somewhere.
 
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