What is an unpopular/controversial opinion you have regarding the ukulele?

Here's an unpopular one:
People who say Ookalaylee, when they are speaking English sound ridiculous. I can even hear it when they write. They call it "an" Ukulele. Ridiculous!!! Should only be pronounced that way by people fluent in Hawaiian...and I mean fluent. Otherwise, you sound silly.
Your attempt at a phonetic spelling renders a pronunciation that I have never heard anywhere. Many folks have adopted the Hawaiian pronunciation in which the first 2 syllables have the same vowel sound, like in the words "coo" or "boo", and the 3rd and 4th syllables also have the same vowel sound which is a short "e" like in "let" or "get". So a phonetic spelling would be something like "ookoolehleh". Of course, that sounds very different from the more "American" or "haole" pronunciation which is closer to "youkalaylee".
Regarding the question of whether English speakers should attempt the original Hawaiian pronunciation or not... that's debatable. I don't want to bash the British, but they have a reputation for absolutely murdering the pronunciation of foreign words with ease. Have you seen the YouTube review where Ko'olau gets pronounced "koolau", sort of like "koolaid". That sort of carelessness can carry nuances of historical colonialism so I don't like it very much. At the same time, while I speak and work in Japanese most of the time, English is my first language. Nevertheless, when using English words in Japanese, I am always careful to pronounce them the Japanese way. To pronounce them the English or American way would sound like I was trying to show off that I'm fluent in English. So clearly I am not very consistent.
 
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Have you seen the YouTube review where Ko'olau gets pronounced "koolau", sort of like "koolaid". That sort of carelessness can carry nuances of historical colonialism so I don't like it very much.

I get annoyed when people who presume to be more or less experts can't be bothered to pronounce the brand names correctly.

And I think the point about historical colonialism is important. It's a bit tone deaf to suggest that "only those fluent in Hawaiian language should pronounce ukulele the Hawaiian way" when the language was banned from public schools in Hawaii for nearly a century and use of the language was actively suppressed to the point that many native Hawaiians to this day aren't fluent despite recent efforts to revive it. It also ignores the fact that Hawaiian Pidgin is an entirely separate recognized language that also would pronounce ukulele the Hawaiian way. To me, I feel like using the Hawaiian pronunciation honors the culture that the US historically tried to stamp out. Though being a haole myself my mouth tends to default to "yoo ka lay lee" even if in my head I think "oo koo leh leh."
 
There's a video from NAMM from several years back and the guy continually say kamaKAH, even as he interviews Chris Kamaka...🤣
Wait, how are you meant to pronounce it?
 
doesn't seem too egregious
It is when you hear it! he actually says kamaKUH, almost sounds like comical 😂

and it's Casey...what's funny is he properly rolls his R pronouncing Shimabukuro and they discuss pronunciation of ukulele at then end 🤣
 
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1. Trying to figure out what is and isn't a ukulele is silly...

2. If a bass guitar is a guitar...
1. I strongly agree
2. I strongly disagree. Not quite strongly enough to argue about it, though. I am content just knowing I’m right. 😜
 
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A wide nut with should not be a premium feature.

It seems most higher-end ukuleles have wider fingerboards, which has dissuaded me from considering several ukes. Conversely, I assume many beginners and people that can’t/won’t spend the money for a midrange+ ukulele could benefit from having wider string spacing.
 
I'm just starting to take notice of nut width/string spacing differences. The KoAloha I recently acquired has a narrow nut, and on top of that the strings are very close together. I've only been playing it for a few days so I'm still trying to figure out the differences. I should preface this by saying I have very big hands. Not real thick, sausage fingers, but just big hands. I can play C to F easily on the piano. Anyway, one impression I've had is that picking is harder with the closely spaced strings. I tend to inadvertently hit adjacent strings. But conversely I'm finding there are some advantages for the left hand. With the strings being closer, barring is much easier. In general I'm finding the left hand to be easier with the closely spaced strings.
Is this normal...? What is the conventional wisdom regarding nut width/string spacing and playability?
 
Koaloha spacing is fairly "normal", despite the slightly wider nut... the same string spacing as Kala and many other brands (speaking to concerts here). this is why just knowing nut width isn't enough info, if you're picky. and if string spacing at the nut is minimally mentioned, spacing at the saddle/bridge is completely ignored (yes there are differences there too).
 
Koaloha spacing is fairly "normal", despite the slightly wider nut... the same string spacing as Kala and many other brands (speaking to concerts here). this is why just knowing nut width isn't enough info, if you're picky. and if string spacing at the nut is minimally mentioned, spacing at the saddle/bridge is completely ignored (yes there are differences there too).
One of the many reasons I like TUS is that they generally include string spacing in their specs as well as nut width. Very useful information.
 
Koaloha spacing is fairly "normal", despite the slightly wider nut... the same string spacing as Kala and many other brands (speaking to concerts here). this is why just knowing nut width isn't enough info, if you're picky. and if string spacing at the nut is minimally mentioned, spacing at the saddle/bridge is completely ignored (yes there are differences there too).
Mine is a 2003 pineapple longneck. The nut is 37mm but the strings are significantly recessed, with the outer edges being just 27mm. While that is only a little bit narrower than my other ukes, at the saddle/bridge the string spacing is a lot narrower than usual, at 38.5mm. All my other ukes are well over 40mm, with some measuring 45mm. So near the sound hole things feel a bit crowded.
 
I'm just starting to take notice of nut width/string spacing differences. The KoAloha I recently acquired has a narrow nut, and on top of that the strings are very close together. I've only been playing it for a few days so I'm still trying to figure out the differences. I should preface this by saying I have very big hands. Not real thick, sausage fingers, but just big hands. I can play C to F easily on the piano. Anyway, one impression I've had is that picking is harder with the closely spaced strings. I tend to inadvertently hit adjacent strings. But conversely I'm finding there are some advantages for the left hand. With the strings being closer, barring is much easier. In general I'm finding the left hand to be easier with the closely spaced strings.
Is this normal...? What is the conventional wisdom regarding nut width/string spacing and playability?
Coming from violin, I just snortgiggle when folks talk about uke strings being too close together. But I think there are “square footage” trade offs. Lots of sopranos now with wider nuts than concerts and even tenors, to “make up” for the shorter scale. I’m discovering that I can manage a larger nut if I have to, but wider string spacing for my left hand sucks. Wider string spacing for my right hand (fingerpicking) has some interesting trade offs. And this is just comparing two sopranos with 10% differences.
 
Mine is a 2003 pineapple longneck. The nut is 37mm but the strings are significantly recessed, with the outer edges being just 27mm. While that is only a little bit narrower than my other ukes, at the saddle/bridge the string spacing is a lot narrower than usual, at 38.5mm. All my other ukes are well over 40mm, with some measuring 45mm. So near the sound hole things feel a bit crowded.
lol, I would adore this!
 
For concerts, I've found that 27-28 mm at the nut (measured o-o) and 39-41 mm at the saddle are fairly typical. These are what you would find on pre-cut (35 mm) nuts and and pre-drilled bridges... again, these are for concerts.
 
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