What is an unpopular/controversial opinion you have regarding the ukulele?

I get annoyed when people who presume to be more or less experts can't be bothered to pronounce the brand names correctly.

And I think the point about historical colonialism is important. It's a bit tone deaf to suggest that "only those fluent in Hawaiian language should pronounce ukulele the Hawaiian way" when the language was banned from public schools in Hawaii for nearly a century and use of the language was actively suppressed to the point that many native Hawaiians to this day aren't fluent despite recent efforts to revive it. It also ignores the fact that Hawaiian Pidgin is an entirely separate recognized language that also would pronounce ukulele the Hawaiian way. To me, I feel like using the Hawaiian pronunciation honors the culture that the US historically tried to stamp out. Though being a haole myself my mouth tends to default to "yoo ka lay lee" even if in my head I think "oo koo leh leh."
100% in agreement. Historically, destroying native languages lead to the destruction of those cultures.
 
Your attempt at a phonetic spelling renders a pronunciation that I have never heard anywhere. Many folks have adopted the Hawaiian pronunciation in which the first 2 syllables have the same vowel sound, like in the words "coo" or "boo", and the 3rd and 4th syllables also have the same vowel sound which is a short "e" like in "let" or "get". So a phonetic spelling would be something like "ookoolehleh". Of course, that sounds very different from the more "American" or "haole" pronunciation which is closer to "youkalaylee".
Regarding the question of whether English speakers should attempt the original Hawaiian pronunciation or not... that's debatable. I don't want to bash the British, but they have a reputation for absolutely murdering the pronunciation of foreign words with ease. Have you seen the YouTube review where Ko'olau gets pronounced "koolau", sort of like "koolaid". That sort of carelessness can carry nuances of historical colonialism so I don't like it very much. At the same time, while I speak and work in Japanese most of the time, English is my first language. Nevertheless, when using English words in Japanese, I am always careful to pronounce them the Japanese way. To pronounce them the English or American way would sound like I was trying to show off that I'm fluent in English. So clearly I am not very consistent.
We should bash the British! Have you heard how the British completely mangled Norman French so that now we have a new language we call “English”?!? Outrageous!
 
It is when you hear it! he actually says kamaKUH, almost sounds like comical 😂

and it's Casey...what's funny is he properly rolls his R pronouncing Shimabukuro and they discuss pronunciation of ukulele at then end 🤣

His pronunciation sounded like a Japanese pronunciation.
 
Trying to figure out what is and isn't a ukulele is silly, because at the end of the day, ukuleles are just small guitars.

If a bass guitar is a guitar, and a lap guitar is a guitar, a ukulele is absolutely a guitar.
I call 'em lutes.
 
There is a place for ukulele players who just want to have fun without obeying a bunch of rules.

Not everyone is interested in learning the "proper" way to finger an E chord, or to keep their thumb pressed against the neck at all times, or to memorize a different strumming pattern for each song.

And no one should be made to feel inadequate because they don't bend their will to the experts and purists.
 
You and me both. And apparently that opportunity is soon to be a thing.
Wait…..it almost sounds as though you’re implying Koaloha might start making baritones. Can such a thing be?
 
My opinion: strap pins installed on used ukuleles significantly decrease their resale value. I see some nice looking ukuleles in the UU marketplace for reasonable prices, but I won't buy them because I think strap pins are ugly and uncomfortable for people who don't use straps. Just my opinion.
 
Wait…..it almost sounds as though you’re implying Koaloha might start making baritones. Can such a thing be?
Someone had posted here earlier about taking the tour at KoAloha recently and one of the things that came up is they are about to start doing just that. I can't seem to put my finger on that post right now but perhaps someone else here recognizes it.

@Dave Holiday said:
Guitars and ukuleles (and the majority of plucked--as opposed to bowed--string instruments) are all members of the lute family, which is part of chordophone instruments.
Violins and cellos? Zithers and sitars? Mountain dulcimers? Diddley bows?
 
His pronunciation sounded like a Japanese pronunciation.
exactly, hence the "properly rolled R" comment... Shimabukuro is a Japanese name, and he got it right, which is kinda funny 'cuz Kamaka looks like a Japanese name (it is not) and he would have pronounced it right going Japanese, but instead he went with kamaKAH/comiCON/comical. :LOL:

here's one for this thread:
Cocobolo ukes do nothing for me... same with romero. :oops:
 
Embedding a neodymium magnet in the endpin spot of my uke will make it strap friendly without the button!
 
UBass players using amps in small rooms drowning out all the acoustic ukes, especially when nobody else is plugged in. Noodling the last then next song.

People who cannot play in time, with the speed of the rest of the group.

ukulele groups are singing groups and singing is primary.
 
Even the super high end prices seem reasonable compared to some guitars:
 
I wasn't all that impressed with the sound of the first several Oli ukes they featured on HMS. And I fear that Pono is getting replaced by Oli at TUS... perhaps because the owner stands to profit more from Oli sales than Pono sales. (running for cover!)
 
Violins and cellos? Zithers and sitars? Mountain dulcimers? Diddley bows?
Zithers aren't technically of the lute family, though they are chordophones. Lutes have a separate neck assembly whereas instruments in the zither family are soundboxes with strings stretched across a soundhole/port but no attached neck. I'd think mountain and hammered duclimers would be considered zithers.

Chordophones are thought to go back at least 5000 years so I'm sure there is some dissension regarding definitions and what is and isn't included in what "species" etc.

And I am far from an expert.
 
Embedding a neodymium magnet in the endpin spot of my uke will make it strap friendly without the button!
but what will it do to your pacemaker as you move your instrument across your chest?
 
Looking through higher priced ukes - what's with no fretdots on the fretboard? It feels like snobbery. So another pretty peeve, unpopular opinion. I like fretdots on the face of the fretboard.
 
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Looking through higher priced ukes - what's with no fretdots on the fretboard? It feels like slobbery. So another pretty peeve, unpopular opinion. I like fretdots on the face of the fretboard.
Maybe it's my opinion that is the unpopular one... I don't use the fret dots on the face of my fretboard, so when I'm getting someone to make me one, unless they feel strongly about it or want to make something decoratively pretty, I just say don't bother.

I would be grumpy with no side fret dots though. I'm rather fond of those.
 
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