What is an unpopular/controversial opinion you have regarding the ukulele?

This encapsulates why this thread is important. If my birria (stew and not the taco) arrived without cilantro I would be channeling my inner-Karen to wave down the waitstaff and let him/her know that something was terribly wrong.
I don’t think most people could ever realize just how degrading and insulting using the name “Karen” in a derogatory way really is to people who are unfortunate enough to have that name. Don’t ask me how I know. Just remember that most of us on forums don’t use our real names!! :( Just sayin….
 
. . . Sometimes simplicity says a whole lot more in music, in general. . . when I go to an open mic night to play (either guitar or ukelele) and someone announces that they are performing their own original song (or worse yet, songs), which is/are usually “dropping” on this or that social media site, :rolleyes:, I cringe. . .

This is all too relatable. I love a solid performance of original work that exhibits thought and craft, but work of that caliber and pride is uncommon at local open mics. In my own work, I strive to strike a delicate balance between sheer volume of output and its curation as I trim excess fat and glean material worth revising. This process seems like a lost art at times, and I sympathize with far fewer fellow artists and amateurs than would be my preference.

. . . I used to think I needed to be a flashy player, use lots of fancy licks. However, what our audiences crave is SINGING. They couldn't care less about a nice ukulele or harmonica break. . . It has forced me to take voice lessons and really work on my singing. . . Less IS more. . . since our vocal harmonies are trickier and sweeter, now they've started asking for encores.

Thank you for the wake-up call. I need to re-invest in vocal performance. For an instrumentalist who surprisingly often provides backup and/or relief vocals, I've been neglecting my progress in this area. I am going to look into re-enrolling in voice lessons. Again, thank you for the wake-up call.

. . . people also like when you interact with them . . . It’s voice/personality first. You also have to show that you really feel and believe what you’re singing about.

I have a deep respect for singers; your choice to embrace an instrument with so much emotional vulnerability and immediacy speaks volumes. I am always trying to perform popular melodies with such conviction as to compel the audience to sing along (at least in their heads), but I would love to be more comfortable in my own skin and sing to them directly. Perhaps one day.
 
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1. This is all too relatable. I love a solid performance of original work that exhibits thought and craft, but work of that caliber and pride is uncommon at local open mics. In my own work, I strive to strike a delicate balance between sheer volume of output and its curation as I trim excess fat and glean material worth revising. This process seems like a lost art at times, and I sympathize with far fewer fellow artists and amateurs than would be my preference.



2. Thank you for the wake-up call. I need to re-invest in vocal performance. For an instrumentalist who surprisingly often provides backup and/or relief vocals, I've been neglecting my progress in this area. I am going to look into re-enrolling in voice lessons. Again, thank you for the wake-up call.



3. I have a deep respect for singers; your choice to embrace an instrument with so much emotional vulnerability and immediacy speaks volumes. I am always trying to perform popular melodies with such conviction as to compel the audience to sing along (at least in their heads), but I would love to be more comfortable in my own skin and sing to them directly. Perhaps one day.
1. Precisely. There is too much ‘notice me’ ‘look at me,’ ‘follow me,’ and not enough of a true love of creating music and making people feel something besides boredom.

2. & 3. I always use the example with my husband about famous singers who do not have the technically greatest voices, but when they sing, there is so much passion, rawness, and emotion that you can’t help but feel something. To me, that’s what singing is all about.…conveying emotion. That aside, one of my favorite songs to sing is “Long, Long Time” by my all-time favorite Linda Ronstadt- who did have a phenomenal voice. Well, I can relate to that song from an experience when I was young, so I sing it with that same ‘pain.’ One time someone started to cry and walked out of the room while I was singing it, but later apologized. They had apparently lost a spouse not too long before and it re-brought up that pain of loss. I experienced some guilt over it, yet I simultaneously felt that I did the song justice.
 
Well, except the Irish, and the baritone "people"...:rolleyes:
Wait a minute, I'm Irish.....and what's a "baritone people?"
 
For whatever reason, I've been watching a few videos of professional musicians clutching their pearls about A.I. and my controversial opinion is that the ukulele community is immune. Mainstream music has been robotic for a while now and A.I. is just the logical extension of that and they've become hoisted on their own capitalistic petards. But we're different. 90% or more of us just enjoy the process. Speaking for myself, my music is mediocre at best and doesn't have any semblance of popular appeal, but it takes all my time and it is time well spent. A computer cannot simulate that experience. At the end of the day, it never occurs to me that nothing I've done is worthy of recording. I'm learning and improving and having fun. And no computer can take that away from me.
 
I don’t think most people could ever realize just how degrading and insulting using the name “Karen” in a derogatory way really is to people who are unfortunate enough to have that name. Don’t ask me how I know. Just remember that most of us on forums don’t use our real names!! :( Just sayin….
Reminds me of this story... a friend worked in a cs call center. She was treated rather poorly by a woman named Felicia. This was right at the height of the second wave of popularity of the term "Bye Felicia"... but when ending the call she did not say "Bye Felicia". A once in a lifetime opportunity lost (and yet professionalism intact).
 
For whatever reason, I've been watching a few videos of professional musicians clutching their pearls about A.I. and my controversial opinion is that the ukulele community is immune. Mainstream music has been robotic for a while now and A.I. is just the logical extension of that and they've become hoisted on their own capitalistic petards. But we're different. 90% or more of us just enjoy the process. Speaking for myself, my music is mediocre at best and doesn't have any semblance of popular appeal, but it takes all my time and it is time well spent. A computer cannot simulate that experience. At the end of the day, it never occurs to me that nothing I've done is worthy of recording. I'm learning and improving and having fun. And no computer can take that away from me.
I don’t think most people could ever realize just how degrading and insulting using the term “clutching their pearls” in a derogatory way really is to people who are unfortunate enough to actually be clutching their pearls... 😆 Don’t ask me how I know. Just sayin….
 
I may have already said this here (my memory is unreliable) but while I mostly play baritone these days, I don't really consider the baritone a true ukulele for a number of reasons.

(Though I have no issue with the fact they are commonly called ukes and I refer to them that way at times myself.)
 
I don’t think most people could ever realize just how degrading and insulting using the term “clutching their pearls” in a derogatory way really is to people who are unfortunate enough to actually be clutching their pearls... 😆 Don’t ask me how I know. Just sayin….
Dang it. I gave away my only string of pearls. I forget that I needed them for clutching;)
 
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