What is the name of this picking technique?

Yukio

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I used to do the standard 'one finger per string' technique for fingerpicking. Recently, I started doing this alternating picking with only the thumb and forefinger for single line riffs. It is has a similar feel to alternating up and down strokes with a plectrum and I seem to be able to pick single lines faster this way.

Please comment and share your thoughts!



-Yukio
 
I had never heard of 1-finger+thumb picking either, but it kind of makes sense for any two adjacent strings. Slight veer, but I was "Trigger"-ed and found this, explaining Willie's use of sus2 and sus4. Go to 4:30.
 
In the banjo world this is called Reno style picking, or two finger single-string style picking.
 
My lesson today included something like this which was parallel to the "down up down up" of a plectrum on lute or pick on mandolin. I'll be practicing this on that Agricola piece for some of the stretches on the G and C strings. My teacher plays lute and we're playing a lot of music that would have been played on lute originally so he brings lute technique into the lesson a lot.
 
The thumb plus one finger is common enough, and this is how Merle Travis played.
What's unusual about what your doing is that the thumb is traveling down to the third string from the bass side, and your finger is going up to the second string from the bass side.
This is a different technique, and I'm not sure that it has a name yet.
 
I often use this method to pick fiddle tunes. similar to flat picking except you pick the notes on the beat with your thumb and off the beat with your finger. Rev Gary Davis often picked fast single note runs on the guitar with this technique and (as Mike Dollarsign mentioned) Don Reno often played single line runs on the banjo using this technique.
It doesn't really need a name, but it's just one method of "two-finger picking".
Here's a sample of Red Haired Boy.
 
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Mark Knopfler is the master at that technique. I don't know the name of it but him and Jeff Beck can/could rip lightning fast leads using their fingers/thumb like that. I don't know for sure but I would think it has to be faster than classical style picking using your i and m fingers.
 
The thumb plus one finger is common enough, and this is how Merle Travis played.
What's unusual about what your doing is that the thumb is traveling down to the third string from the bass side, and your finger is going up to the second string from the bass side.
This is a different technique, and I'm not sure that it has a name yet.
Yes. My example just touched on the first (A) string, but I would play that string with the thumb and forefinger (alternating) as well. I have been trying to get it faster, similar to using a pick.
 
I often use this method to pick fiddle tunes. similar to flat picking except you pick the notes on the beat with your thumb and off the beat with your finger. Rev Gary Davis often picked fast single note runs on the guitar with this technique and (as Mike Dollarsign mentioned) Don Reno often played single line runs on the banjo using this technique.
It doesn't really need a name, but it's just one method of "two-finger picking".
Here's a sample of Red Haired Boy.

Love it, Jim!
Can you ask your other music buddies what they might call this technique? Maybe Reno picking like Mike suggested? I like this style and I want to get better at it. I think it deserves a name.
 
Mark Knopfler is the master at that technique. I don't know the name of it but him and Jeff Beck can/could rip lightning fast leads using their fingers/thumb like that. I don't know for sure but I would think it has to be faster than classical style picking using your i and m fingers.
Thanks, Chris. I love Knopfler's tone and technique. I never studied what it is he does to get that tone. Do you know where to find video of him and Jeff Beck doing this thing?
 
Thanks, Chris. I love Knopfler's tone and technique. I never studied what it is he does to get that tone. Do you know where to find video of him and Jeff Beck doing this thing?
Starting at 4:40 you get some good views of his fingers. He's amazing.
 
It's all over but at 4:00 there are some good views. Jeff Beck does it so he can have the rest of his fingers to play with the whammy and volume controls. I can see how this picking style can evolve into "chicken picking" where you have do a ton of 3 note chords and riffs. What I find difficult about this technique is getting the same tone out of my thumb and finger.
 
Here is some Don Reno and Red Smiley with The Tennessee Cut-Ups in a music program sponsored by Kroger Grocery Stores.



At 16:00 Don Reno plays Arkansas Traveller with his single-note technique.

There are other great moments (like the host busting out Bill Bailey on the piano) so you might just as well watch the whole thing.
Thanks to @Mike Dollarsign and @Canada Jim !!
 
Here is some Don Reno and Red Smiley with The Tennessee Cut-Ups in a music program sponsored by Kroger Grocery Stores.



At 16:00 Don Reno plays Arkansas Traveller with his single-note technique.

There are other great moments (like the host busting out Bill Bailey on the piano) so you might just as well watch the whole thing.
Thanks to @Mike Dollarsign and @Canada Jim !!

The playing was outstanding and that was fun to watch. Campell's tomato soup was 10 cents.:oops:
 
I have no idea what it's called, but I do it a lot. If it's good enough for Don Reno and Merle Travis.....
 
I have no idea what it's called, but I do it a lot. If it's good enough for Don Reno and Merle Travis.....
Don Reno often uses this technique on the banjo, interspersed with three finger picking. His guitar picking was amazing, but he used a flat pick to play guitar. Doc Watson said that Don Reno was flat-picking fiddle tunes on the guitar before he was.
Merle Travis's style is a muted alternating thumb, often on electric guitar, while picking the melody and fills with his index finger on the treble strings. Doc Watson used this same style on the acoustic guitar. He was an admirer of Merle and named his son after Merle.
Rev Gary Davis often used the single string "thumb on the beat and index off the beat" for runs and fills.





 
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