What makes a uke's bridge suddenly explode away from the body?

Aha yes! I do remember that story, now that you mention it. 😅
Hah! No. Actually my nephew rejected it outright at Christmas. A disappointment but hey, I've always wanted a pineapple uke so I kept it. I was playing my Millar concert when the Ohana pineapple bridge exploded- nut and all. I'm hoping by Monday the seller and/or Ohana will reply to my emails...hoping for a new one actually.
 
It's like a marriage...many years under constant pressure, somebody always wanting to wind you up, and then...pop...it's splitsville, and you're wondering...where the hell did that saddle go?
LOL :)
 
One of my uke's just suddenly went "blam" and the bridge blew off. Why would that happen? I play it nearly every day and keep it humidified. Could it be the uke had been sitting too long before it was sold? I just bought this one a month ago...

Any chance I can get it repaired or replaced by the seller? Will I have to learn uke surgery????
If the strings are set too tight, it can create too much tension on the bridge, which can eventually cause it to break. Setting the strings incorrectly or using strings with the wrong tension can cause problems.
 
Bought it new; this was supposed to be a gift, glad it happened in my possession...well not glad but, you know. Just picked it up and noticed even the nut came away!

I'm thinking this uke has been sitting around for a long time and dried out in a warehouse. Even the soundboard has suspicious hairlines in it underneath the gloss finish.

I'm hoping to get a replacement- I'll email Ohana as well.
I once bought an Ohana from Mims during winter. I left in the box to properly stabilize but when I removed it the headstock actually cracked. Mim immediately replaced it for me. I have a number of Ohana without issues. I guess freak things happen.
 
This has always been my nightmare, and it’s one reason I now have ukes with bridges that string through the body.
So do I. Although I’ve never had that happen to any tie bridge I’ve ever owned, I recognise that string through bridges handle the forces that are trying to lift the bridge more successfully.
 
One of my uke's just suddenly went "blam" and the bridge blew off. Why would that happen? I play it nearly every day and keep it humidified. Could it be the uke had been sitting too long before it was sold? I just bought this one a month ago...

Any chance I can get it repaired or replaced by the seller? Will I have to learn uke surgery????

You have glue under a lot of tension. That happened with one of mine. I cleaned both surfaces and glued it back with Titebond III. Magic Fluke uses little nails in addition to glue. That makes the bridge very difficult to remove.
 
If the strings are set too tight, it can create too much tension on the bridge, which can eventually cause it to break. Setting the strings incorrectly or using strings with the wrong tension can cause problems.
Well yeah.
 
You have glue under a lot of tension. That happened with one of mine. I cleaned both surfaces and glued it back with Titebond III. Magic Fluke uses little nails in addition to glue. That makes the bridge very difficult to remove.
Wouldn't the uke need to be set up again though? I mean the bridge and the nut both went blam. I'm hoping for another one
 
I've never had this happen to me. I've had two tenors where the bridge had space under the bottom edges and contacted the dealer and seller and both told me they had always been this way. They suggested I contact the company for the one tenor, and the luthier for the other. Both reassured me that the bridge was intentionally installed this way to compensate for expansion and contraction of the soundboard. That if the bridge was completely glued solidly to the soundboard, the different rates of change between the two wood types and thicknesses would result in a loosening of the glue, and could even result in a crack in the soundboard.

Recently, there seem to be more makers that have screws in the bridges to help position them and strengthen their bond to the top. They are often covered by two plugs on the left and right sides of the bridge.

I've seen pictures of bridges that came away, and took a part of the sound board with it. The wood in the soundboard had a hidden flaw that weakened the top and it eventually broke away while under tension.

I think the mfg should replace the uke under warranty for a manufacturing defect.

Good luck.
 
I've never had this happen to me. I've had two tenors where the bridge had space under the bottom edges and contacted the dealer and seller and both told me they had always been this way. They suggested I contact the company for the one tenor, and the luthier for the other. Both reassured me that the bridge was intentionally installed this way to compensate for expansion and contraction of the soundboard. That if the bridge was completely glued solidly to the soundboard, the different rates of change between the two wood types and thicknesses would result in a loosening of the glue, and could even result in a crack in the soundboard.
I haven't heard of space being left intentionally, so that surprises me. With acoustic guitars, you shouldn't be able to fit a sheet of paper in between the soundboard and any part of the bridge, so I've just assumed that's also true of ukes. Steel strings are putting a great deal more tension on a bridge, but I'd still be suspicious of a lifting bridge on a uke --as you were!
 
I can’t believe that any reputable dealer would not go to bat for you with Kamaka to get you a replacement. Although this is a brand that has good quality control processes , there are no guarantees of perfection when it comes to natural and other materials used during manufacture. In other words s** happen and , I found out that, you’ll avoid disappointment if you set your expectations of the universe appropriately. I think that this will end well for you.
 
I can’t believe that any reputable dealer would not go to bat for you with Kamaka to get you a replacement. Although this is a brand that has good quality control processes , there are no guarantees of perfection when it comes to natural and other materials used during manufacture. In other words s** happen and , I found out that, you’ll avoid disappointment if you set your expectations of the universe appropriately. I think that this will end well for you.

How old was the Kamaka before this happened? I know that happened to my mother's Kamaka once, but that was about 50 years after she bought it and Kamaka does not have a lifetime warranty.
 
I've never had this happen to me. I've had two tenors where the bridge had space under the bottom edges and contacted the dealer and seller and both told me they had always been this way. They suggested I contact the company for the one tenor, and the luthier for the other. Both reassured me that the bridge was intentionally installed this way to compensate for expansion and contraction of the soundboard. That if the bridge was completely glued solidly to the soundboard, the different rates of change between the two wood types and thicknesses would result in a loosening of the glue, and could even result in a crack in the soundboard.

Recently, there seem to be more makers that have screws in the bridges to help position them and strengthen their bond to the top. They are often covered by two plugs on the left and right sides of the bridge.

I've seen pictures of bridges that came away, and took a part of the sound board with it. The wood in the soundboard had a hidden flaw that weakened the top and it eventually broke away while under tension.

I think the mfg should replace the uke under warranty for a manufacturing defect.

Good luck.
Called Ohana and they were very professional and said no worries just work through the dealer for a replacement. So I expect to hear from them via email any day now.
 
With hot hide glue it's the opposite of drying out: too much humidity will weaken the bond. Different strings cause different tensions as well.
 
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