What's happening in your shed?

Which soundboard choices did you go with in the end?
Had a request to purchase the Blackwood with Torrified Sitka so here they are with bodies before I applied pore filler.
 

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I've not been doing much instrument building over the last few months due to other projects, including our never-ending basement remodel. I had been eyeing the Veritas Shooting Sander, but decided to make my own version from laminated plywood. Edges were chamfered and sanded to eliminate splinters, and strips of UHMW tape added to the bottom to enhance gliding. A small rebate was cut along the edge of the shooting board so neither my planes nor my shooting sander cut into the board. This will be helpful when I begin working on the Red Spruce top for my next project. Soon. I hope.

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Here is two new tenors I finished lately. They are both lattice braced strung low g. One is all African Mahogany with a Rosewood fingerboard and bridge and figured Maple head plate. The other is very nice old straight grained Rosewood with a Torrified Sitka Spruce top, Rosewood finger board, bridge and head plate. The Mahogany has more midrange as I would expect and the Rosewood Spruce has more bass and treble response. They both produce a strong full sound, I'm happy with my new design!


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damn! wild as all get out. 4 frets? serious? and the nut design...gotta have a sound demo. it's gorgeous.
Haha Thanks...but it's not a player...it's just a wallhanger! Only an inch thick! Told ya, I'm no Luthier...but love playing with barnwood, and junk. Gonna make a bunch more, cuz I've got lots of scrapwood and junk to use 😊. I'll make one for you, if ya want 😉
 
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This UVBass is a semiacoustic version of a flying V as a Bass ukulele. Body is made from my old kitchen cupboard doors, blackwood for sure but who knows from where. Neck is Tasmanian oak. Fretboard and bridge are recycled ironbark flooring. The V on the 5th fret and fret markers were made by me from kitchen leftover abalone shell. The tuners, pickup, strings and preamp from Aliexpress. Volume & tone knobs and headstock veneer are also blackwood, which were chemically stained with rusty steel wool and vinegar mixed together. The scratch plate mimics the Gibson flying V somewhat.

I give my ukes away on a donation to charity or play it forward basis. My output includes everything from archaic and regulation to electric to Tahitian to novelty, banjo and cookie tin. From the sublime to the ridiculous and occasionally the sublimely ridiculous. You ask for and I send a uke and when you receive it you give a donation to a charity. Messenger or email Ian.titulaer@gmail.com to order.
See my website for more info and past work https://sites.google.com/site/titchtheclown/
 
Is that a lefty? Or the photo is reversed? Or soundholes on both sides?
i’m trying out a few with soundholes (and side dots) on both sides for the Southern Uke Store. this is the 3rd one done like this. the first 2 sounded great so i don’t think the extra soundhole is taking away from the sound. i also didn’t compensate the bridge on these, so hopefully if a lefty picks it up, the strings just need to be switched. there might be some saddle adjustment needed for intonation. it also has a zero fret so probably wouldn’t need any adjustment on the nut.
 
How did you get those wavy edges to match up so exactly?
i follow the natural live edge down the side of the left piece. i do take the smallest spindle sander i have and try to not have too many wavy parts smaller than that smallest spindle. then i use the left piece to draw that edge on the right piece. then take it to the bandsaw and then over to that small spindle sander. it takes a little bit of back and forth work to get it to line up nicely. Then i glue them together like any other top. i also do some thoughtful custom bracing around the soundhole and the seam.

here’s the first time i did one of these live edge seams. but didn’t do the spindle trick. it took a lot longer.

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i follow the natural live edge down the side of the left piece. i do take the smallest spindle sander i have and try to not have too many wavy parts smaller than that smallest spindle. then i use the left piece to draw that edge on the right piece. then take it to the bandsaw and then over to that small spindle sander. it takes a little bit of back and forth work to get it to line up nicely. Then i glue them together like any other top. i also do some thoughtful custom bracing around the soundhole and the seam.

here’s the first time i did one of these live edge seams. but didn’t do the spindle trick. it took a lot longer.

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That is absolutely amazing, and SO BEAUTIFUL!!! ❤️❤️❤️🤩
 
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