What's happening in your shed?

The latest set of three.
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All have redwood tops. The redwood used to be water tanks on the top of New York City apartment buildings. The tanks are banded with iron bands which causes the black staining. I had the very fine grained board from the middle instrument data dendrochronologically and the wood grew some time between 979-1734 AD.

From left to right:

'Super tenor' - baritone body with a17” tenor scale neck. Back & sides are Florida rosewood - more properly this is North Indian Rosewood (Dalbergia sissoo) . It is a true rosewood being in genus Dalbergia. It is planted around south Florida as a landscape tree. This came from a log my wood-turning neighbor gave me from a big tree taken down in Loxahatchee Florida. Quilted sapele binding, pomelle sapele headplate, backstrap and arm bevel. Heart pink abalone (Haliotis corrugata) rosette. Mahogany neck with Casuarina (Casuarina equisetifolia) fingerboard. Casuarina was planted all over south Florida, and it is now considered an invasive species. It is very hard and heavy,comparable to the ebonies, and is very abrasion resistant.

Tenor - back & sides are Carrotwood (Cupaniopsis anacardioides) - this is a landscape tree planted all over south Florida. It is rather invasive as it makes berries that the birds spread around. Rarely gets very big but my neighbor took down a big one (biggest I've seen) and the tree guys were nice enough to bring a chunk across the street to my place. Quite hard and heavy. Sycamore binding, 'Picasso' headplate, rosette & endgraft, customer's initials on heel. Mahogany neck with Casuarina fingerboard with wood dots.

Guitalele - 17" tenor scale. Back and sides are English walnut ((Juglans regia) grown in Denver, Pennsylvania, sawn at Hudock's sawmill in Perkiomenville,PA. Curly koa binding and headplate, koa rosette. Spanish cedar neck with katalox fingerboard.

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Red wood from a train trestle, Granadillo back, Kera sides, Ceder and Canary neck with birds eye maple fretboard and bridge. This tenor and baritone were built together with each using wood from the consecutively cut portions of each tree. Case was at hand during the building process so to be sure that ukuleles fit this time.
 

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I'm aggravated at myself. I messed up one of the Pernambuco sides on my current build. I'm bending by hand, and somehow ended up with about 1/8" difference in the bends between the two sides, despite securely clamping both sides in the mold immediately after bending. Pernambuco is absolutely the most difficult wood I have ever tried to bend. I appeared to get some springback in one side once the pieces had cooled. The pieces were very stiff, and since I had already repaired a small crack in the waist on one side, I decided not to push the issue. I trimmed the pieces to length, put them in the mold, glued in the blocks, trimmed the back to shape, glued in the linings, and sanded everything flush.

To my relatively untrained eye, I can see the discrepancy between the two sides, and it is confirmed when I measure the curves. I'll be honest, I have considered just cutting out the blocks, tossing the sides, and starting over. But Pernambuco is rare wood. I have a lot of work in the body at this point. And after examining and measuring everything carefully, I don't think the flub is going to affect the functionality of the instrument. The heel block is square to the top of the rims and to the centerline. The profiles of the rims and blocks are exactly how I intended to shape them. The soundboard and back, which are already braced, will be good fits to the rim. I'll just have a slightly wonky shape to one side. I guess I'm just really frustrated with myself. I expected better with my 19th overall instrument.
 
I would guess many of my bodies vary by an eighth of an inch. I use very basic fixturing, particularly for my teardrop shapes where the sides are not 90 degrees to top or bottom over much of the outline. Makes them more organic and unique, but to each his own. I would never notice that level of variation, but I feel your pain when a result isn’t as desired. I experience THAT all the time. I have built 30 instruments.
 
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Here it is. To me, the curve on the right side of the image is glaringly different. I showed it to my wife, and she just shrugged and said something like "I really don't see a big difference. " I have not started the neck yet, but as you're looking at it, as long as I am careful and don't deviate from my usual procedure, the neck line will be straight down the middle.

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I would find that amount of variation acceptable. Anyway, there's nothing you can do at this stage to make it more symmetrical. One of the best sounding sopranos I have made was quite a bit more skew whiff - just holding it up at arm's length revealed its "individuality". I gave it to a friend who absolutely loves it.
 
Wabi sabi ☺️
 
I'm aggravated at myself. I messed up one of the Pernambuco sides on my current build. I'm bending by hand, and somehow ended up with about 1/8" difference in the bends between the two sides, despite securely clamping both sides in the mold immediately after bending. Pernambuco is absolutely the most difficult wood I have ever tried to bend. I appeared to get some springback in one side once the pieces had cooled. The pieces were very stiff, and since I had already repaired a small crack in the waist on one side, I decided not to push the issue. I trimmed the pieces to length, put them in the mold, glued in the blocks, trimmed the back to shape, glued in the linings, and sanded everything flush.

To my relatively untrained eye, I can see the discrepancy between the two sides, and it is confirmed when I measure the curves. I'll be honest, I have considered just cutting out the blocks, tossing the sides, and starting over. But Pernambuco is rare wood. I have a lot of work in the body at this point. And after examining and measuring everything carefully, I don't think the flub is going to affect the functionality of the instrument. The heel block is square to the top of the rims and to the centerline. The profiles of the rims and blocks are exactly how I intended to shape them. The soundboard and back, which are already braced, will be good fits to the rim. I'll just have a slightly wonky shape to one side. I guess I'm just really frustrated with myself. I expected better with my 19th overall instrument.
1/8th" isn't enough to worry about. I have repaired a lot of old ukes that are way more than that.
 
The top is fitted and glued. I will not glue on the back until I have dry fitted the neck and installed the K&K pickups on the bridge plate. I always adjust the distance of the nuts on the jack, then put it in a small zip-lock bag and lightly tape it to the underside of the soundboard. Makes things far less fussy at setup time.

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