Why can't I play a G major chord?

BiosphereDecay

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I've been trying and trying for literally months now like 4 or 5 months at least, and I still can't do it. I feel like I plateaued several months ago and have not made any progress since then.

I'm trying to learn a song which has a progression of D A G A F#m D. I can finger everything in there at even at a fast-paced, and I chose the A to G because I thought it would make the G easier. I don't have to take my index finger off the fretboard, I just slide it down one fret. The middle finger usually hits its Mark correctly, but I just don't have a good enough control over my ring finger to do it I think. Wrist tendonitis/hand tremor/muscle atrophy, blah blah, I've said that before many times. So I just don't know how to feel at this point. I might not be able to do it because of my disability, but I really really want to.

If any of you know anything about fingering with poor ring finger control, please let me know. It seems like it should be so easy, but... not for me apparently. Or if you struggled with the g chord, how did you get past it?
 
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It's a tough one! When I'm teaching Kids how to play at school, it's the third chord I introduce, and that's because it takes a long time to learn. May as well get on it right away!

I start with a G6 (0202) which isn't the worst fake G, and you can just barre it (0222)... and then work in G7.

Be patient and stick with it... it's a part of so many songs you really can't live without it.
 
f you have problems wih your ring finger, do "bunny ears". Index finger on second fret of the A, E and C string and my middle finger on the third fret of the E string.
Well I can do that, but it does seem harder. Maybe that's cuz I haven't been practicing it for the last 5 months haha. I'll give that a shot for a while and see how I feel about it

Something that might help: could someone show me a picture or better yet a video of how they play the G chord like that? It seems like so much more "travel" than from A to the standard G
 
The best way to judge what may help is if you show a video of you playing that chord and switching to and from it.
 
Practice very slowly, even just for a few minutes. Each time you have an impulse to do something unnecessary, don't to it. Practice instead. Set a goal for yourself. For example, "I won't post anything on UU (or some other site) until I can play a G major chord." You might be surprised how quickly you can learn if you do some focused practicing on a regular basis.
 
Practice very slowly, even just for a few minutes. Each time you have an impulse to do something unnecessary, don't to it. Practice instead. Set a goal for yourself. For example, "I won't post anything on UU (or some other site) until I can play a G major chord." You might be surprised how quickly you can learn if you do some focused practicing on a regular basis.
I mean I do spend a lot of my time distracted because of ADHD, but I invest many hours every single day in practicing or writing music. Some days I play or write for like 10 hours. Like every spare moment of the entire day. That's why I don't understand why I'm not progressing.
 
This is probably not encouraging, but I've been playing for 2 years and I STILL struggle with transitioning to G chord. Not always, not as horribly, but it's by far not my easiest regular chord, and I flap my pinky around super annoyingly whenever I transition to it. Especially from F or to F, which is like ALL THE TIME.
 
I'd say, just slow down and practice moving slowly, accurately and cleanly between chords. Then slowly speed up. If you have a metronome, that may help you control your speed. It seems you can play that chord, but are a bit hesitant when making changes. The amount of times you play the chord improves the sound of the chord. Make sure that each note of the chord rings clear as well.
 
I'd say, just slow down and practice moving slowly, accurately and cleanly between chords. Then slowly speed up. If you have a metronome, that may help you control your speed. It seems you can play that chord, but are a bit hesitant when making changes. The amount of times you play the chord improves the sound of the chord. Make sure that each note of the chord rings clear as well.
I find it pretty hard to play slowly. If I just don't think about it and play naturally, it comes out at like 150 BPM. I think it might work if I start as slow as I can, and then increase it by maybe 5 BPM per day. Does that sound like a reasonable approach?
 
I find it pretty hard to play slowly. If I just don't think about it and play naturally, it comes out at like 150 BPM. I think it might work if I start as slow as I can, and then increase it by maybe 5 BPM per day. Does that sound like a reasonable approach?
Sure it sounds reasonable. As long as you don't speed up before you are playing cleanly and smoothly. If you practice playing a chord the wrong way, or sounding a bit off, you won't really improve. But if you take the time to train yourself well, it will pay off when learning things in the future.
 
Sure it sounds reasonable. As long as you don't speed up before you are playing cleanly and smoothly. If you practice playing a chord the wrong way, or sounding a bit off, you won't really improve. But if you take the time to train yourself well, it will pay off when learning things in the future.
Hmm that's kind of contradictory to the advice I was originally given. I was told to focus on the rhythm, and just keep playing in time even if you screw up a chord.

But I'll give that approach a shot, since the other one doesn't seem to be working.
 
For me, when switching between A to G, I don’t slide my index finger down. That makes it harder for me. I lift my index finger and then form the G shape.

for G, try this, put your index and middle finger down on the first and third strings (A and C strings) and then within a fraction of a second have your ring finger land on the E string (2nd string). When making this shape I find it easier to land the index and middle finger first as a pair followed quickly by the ring finger,

you’ve almost got it. In about a month you’ll be a master at this chord!
 
not as horribly, but it's by far not my easiest regular chord, and I flap my pinky around super annoyingly whenever I transition to it. Especially from F or to F, which is like ALL THE TIME.

I'm also clumsy on Bb to F, which LOOKS like it should be easy....but no question, my F to G (even more than G to F) is....not good. Like, REALLY not good. LOL And you're right, this is one of the common groupings out there.

So right now, I'm practicing. That little doot-doot-doot riff on When Doves Cry (it pops up right after that opening solo, and then every time there's a vocal break) is a FAST F, followed by a FAST G, both in the same bar. For the "usual" strum, it's basically the down-down on F, and the up-up-down-up on G. I have to go slooooowly to get it started, but once I get going, I can usually keep it going...until I then go on to the rest of the song. :ROFLMAO: At that point, I have to start over.

I hate to say it, but the thing I keep coming back to is that the answer is PRACTICE. I've only recently let my "playing" take a back seat to PRACTICE, that intentional drilling to get through the trouble spots. It's a little frustrating sometimes, but I'm seeing progress, and feel like I'll be able soon to get back to my preferred mix of about 50-50.
 
For me, when switching between A to G, I don’t slide my index finger down. That makes it harder for me. I lift my index finger and then form the G shape.

for G, try this, put your index and middle finger down on the first and third strings (A and C strings) and then within a fraction of a second have your ring finger land on the E string (2nd string). When making this shape I find it easier to land the index and middle finger first as a pair followed quickly by the ring finger,

you’ve almost got it. In about a month you’ll be a master at this chord!
Okay this is actually making sense to me. I'm going to practice trying to do it this way.
 
I just did a little test. I tried playing without any chords at 60 BPM, and then I tried at 200 BPM

At 60 I was out of time after the 2nd bar
At 200 I was in time for several minutes before I decided to stop playing.

How do I deal with just having the inherent urge to go fast? (Queue Sonic X intro) It's so deeply ingrained that going fast is good and easy, and going slow is boring and frustrating.
 
Okay this is actually making sense to me. I'm going to practice trying to do it this way.
Also when making the A shape my fingernails on my index and ring finger are directed at my face. When I make the G shape it pivots slightly and the fingernails are directed more toward the sound hole a bit

I also agree with the prior poster that you should practice slowly and then build speed. When you are playing in a group yes I agree make sure you keep up and don’t worry about little mistakes here and there but if you’re learning new chord shapes build speed.
 
Hmm that's kind of contradictory to the advice I was originally given. I was told to focus on the rhythm, and just keep playing in time even if you screw up a chord.

But I'll give that approach a shot, since the other one doesn't seem to be working.
it doesn't sound contradictory to me. I'm not telling you to stop. I'm saying don't increase the speed until you can play at your current speed cleanly and accurately. Of course focus on the rhythm, but if you play to the rhythm making the same mistakes over and over, you will never get comfortable playing the G chord.
 
it doesn't sound contradictory to me. I'm not telling you to stop. I'm saying don't increase the speed until you can play at your current speed cleanly and accurately. Of course focus on the rhythm, but if you play to the rhythm making the same mistakes over and over, you will never get comfortable playing the G chord.
Yeah that makes sense
 
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