why no even-numbered chords ??

Guessing here... a 10 note might be the same as a 3 note, so you still just have the major chord, likely a different inversion. So the 1, 3, and 5 are the same notes as the 10, 12, and 14.

Added: Should be "3, 5, and 7" (not 1)
 
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8, 10, 12 & 14 are all taken care of as the 1, 3, 5 & 7 of 7th chords so unless you are having for example both the major and minor third in the one chord they are not needed. 2 & 4 are common as 9 & 13, implying the 7th chord below but are also used as sus2 & sus4. 13 implies a 7th chord underneath but 6 implies just a triad. In the end it is just tradition and based on chords being made up of stacked thirds.
 
I asked this question on another forum, and finally got the RIGHT answer.
Implicit in 9,11,13 chords, is the (dominant)7. That's the short answer.

The truth is, the octave doesn't matter. Even though a 9 chord kind of implies that's it's a 2 an octave higher, in reality, you can play the 9 as a 2 and it doesn't matter. This bugged me for a while and I asked why it was called a 9 and not an add2.
Eventually someone spilled the beans on another forum.
The difference between an add2 and a 9, is that in a 9 chord, there is also an implied 7.
In theory, if you want to go that far, its about "stacking" thirds.

EDIT" so why no evens such as 10, 12 and 14?
A 10 is just a 3, a 12 is just a 5 and a 14 is just a 7, and you can play them anywhere you like, it doesn't matter.
a 3 and 5 are implied anyway, and what octave you play them at doesn't matter. A 14 is just a 7, yet with this method of chord notation the (dominant)7 is also implied in higher order chords, so left out for convenience.
 
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Guessing here... a 10 note might be the same as a 3 note, so you still just have the major chord, likely a different inversion. So the 1, 3, and 5 are the same notes as the 10, 12, and 14.
I like your simple answer the best, @rainbow21. Adding a 10, 12, or 14 is redundant as it does not impart any new harmonic information to a chord, just like it would be silly to add an additional 8 to a chord. We build up extended chords from the 1, 3, 5, and b7. The remaining possible notes; 2, 4, and 6 are filled in by the 9, 11, and 13 respectively.

As a side note, the 11th is kind of a stinky chord. It is adding a perfect fourth to a chord which already has the third, just a half-step away. These tones clash in an 11th. A minor 11th is less discordant than a unaltered 11th chord.
 
The m6 is my favorite chord quality. I frequently use it as a substitute for a Δ7 because to my ear they share a certain vibe. Another thing that is cool about the m6 is that its shapes are the same as 9 chords or ø chords--the only difference is which note is the root.

I usually play a 13 chord with the intervals 3, b7, 9, and 13. And the 13 is just the 6 one octave higher. That's how it fits into my equation.
 
The m6 is my favorite chord quality. I frequently use it as a substitute for a Δ7 because to my ear they share a certain vibe. Another thing that is cool about the m6 is that its shapes are the same as 9 chords or ø chords--the only difference is which note is the root.

I usually play a 13 chord with the intervals 3, b7, 9, and 13. And the 13 is just the 6 one octave higher. That's how it fits into my equation.
That makes sense. Thanks.
 
Where do 6th chords (C6, G6 etc.) fit into the equation?
Where does the 6 fit?
As a 6.
It's all about how you name chords for convenience, so that musicians understand exactly what the chord is, without extensively long chord names.
Take a G Maj chord.
The root note is given in the name, and it is implied that there is also a 3 and 5 in a Maj chord.
Maj or Min defines the nature of the 3.
So a 6 is just the root, the 3, the 5 (this is all implied) and calling a chord a 6 gives you the 4th note.

Yes I should have pointed out that the 7 we are talking about here is the dominant of flat 7. Not a Maj 7.
There can be 3 broad classifications of chords. Major chords, minor chords and dominant chords, so implicit in all the higher order named chords is the dominant 7, therefore they are all classified as dominant chords.

What octave you play a note at doesn't matter at all to the name of the chord, even though a different inversion has a different sound. We don't name inversions.
Take a very simple ukulele G Maj. 0232. The notes are g,d,g,b. Root, fifth, root, third.
Now conceivably, the third is an octave above and you may think that we can call it a G Maj10, yet we just don't name chords this way.
It's just a simple G Maj.
 
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Where does the 6 fit?
As a 6.
I only asked the question because the title of the thread asked why there were no even numbered chords.
Ripock (OP) answered that he thinks of his 6 chords (even numbered) as 13 chords.
 
I only asked the question because the title of the thread asked why there were no even numbered chords.
Ripock (OP) answered that he thinks of his 6 chords (even numbered) as 13 chords.
Well, kind of no actually.
Using the common rules of chord naming, a 6 chord is 1,3,5,6, and a 13 chord is 1,3,5,6,b7.
That's the difference.

Now of course, this leads to the elephant in the room. How can we play 5 note chords on a ukulele?
Answer. Some of the lower order notes like the 5, the 3 and even the 1 get left out sometimes.

EDIT again. Leaving out notes in extended chords is common place. When playing a Maj6 chord, its kind of normal to leave the 5 out and play the 6 in its place.
All the notes that get left out, is part of the reason for simple 3 or 4 note ukulele chords to be so ambiguous.
 
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Once again, I find myself happy about just playing by ear, and putting my fingers wherever they sound good.

I think that's the duckie and horsie...
 
Even better, since we’re a treble instrument, our brains are happy to fill in the root of we aren’t playing it. E.g. “Hawaiian D7” has no D.
 
Once again, I find myself happy about just playing by ear, and putting my fingers wherever they sound good.

I think that's the duckie and horsie...
Oooh, I envy your ability to do that! Music is so delicious and I enjoy it tremendously, but my ear is terrible. Chords and harmony and structure are this whole tantalizing new world that I’m grabbing for like a kid chasing fireflies.

Remember the scene in Out of Africa where they play a classical record for the troop of monkeys, and the monkeys get all excited about the music and go crashing into the record player and break it? I swear, I’m one of those monkeys.
 
We've all seen 9, 11, and 13 chords. But why aren't there 10, 12, and 14 chords? Does anyone know why?

It's because chords are constructed using the the odd-numbered notes of a scale.

Here's a piano keyboard for all the visual learners (you know who you are 😄):

piano keyboard chord tones.jpg

The white keys represent a C Major scale in two octaves with the "C chord" notes numbered in blue.

A basic C Major triad uses three notes: 1, 3, & 5 (C, E, & G)
A 7th chord uses four notes: 1, 3, 5, & 7 (C, E, G, & B)
From there, just keep adding odd-numbered notes in the 2nd octave to get the 9th, 11th, & 13th chords.

Now, it's impossible to play full chords with more than four notes on a 4-stringed instrument, so we have to leave notes out when playing 9th, 11th, and 13th chords on the ukulele. The first notes to leave out are the root and the fifth (the 1 & the 5). This is because the 9, 11, & 13 chords are all built on a 7th chord, and a 7th chord is defined by the third and the seventh (3 & 7) chord tones. As long as you have the 3 & 7, you can add or omit any of the other chord tones to build chords that will sound good, depending on the song and chord progression.

Y'all probably already know all that, but thanks for letting me spell it out as simply as possible for my own understanding. After all, I'm from the South and have to keep things simple! :LOL:
 
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