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Thread: Re-entrant baritone?

  1. #1
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    Default Re-entrant baritone?

    I have a tenor guitar that isn’t selling so I’m thinking of tuning it like a baritone uke with a high d.
    Is anyone tuning their baritone with a re-entrant setup? dGBE work? I had this setup on a tenor banjo for awhile so that I could play “clawhammer” style.

  2. #2
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    Hi Cornfield, I don't have a baritone any more, but when I did, it worked nicely with the Living Water high-d set available on the Uke Republic website, which I think is the set you're looking for. Have a good week!

  3. #3
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    I'll be using a very light steel string to get the best sound out of this Martin tenor guitar. Probably "Silk and Steel".

  4. #4
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    Oops! Sorry, I forgot it's a tenor guitar you're working with!

  5. #5
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    You're only changing one string, right? Won't cost much to try it. Get the appropriate string from your local guitar store for a couple bucks...

    I got a baritone cheap off of craigslist and was going to tune it GCEA, but it sounded krappy. Put regular baritone strings on it and it sounded great. But, since I don't play baritone, I sold it to a very happy friend.
    Last edited by UkerDanno; 09-23-2019 at 03:18 AM.
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  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by UkerDanno View Post
    You're only changing one string, right? Won't cost much to try it. Get the appropriate string from your local guitar store for a couple bucks...

    I got a baritone cheap off of craigslist and was going to tune it GCEA, but it sounded krappy. Put regular baritone strings on it and it sounded great. But, since I don't play baritone, I sold it to a very happy friend.
    Right now it's tuned in fifths so I'll need a whole new set of strings. I like fifths tuning but it's just not embedded in my DNA.

  7. #7
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    I have a short scale steel string tenor guitar, which I currently have strung low D. I have been thinking, too, of changing the tuning. I often play with other six-string guitar players and thought a different tuning would help to add a different sound. I hadn't considered re-entrant but that might be a choice. I like the way it sounds and I have had it on my baritone uke in the past (don't play bari much since I got the TG tho). I didn't keep it on though because I much prefer the logic of linear for finding melody notes finger style (and appreciate the few extra notes). I also am considering traditional fifths tuning, as this would definitely put me in a different sonic space. I do love the range and symmetry of fifths tuning (for playing lead), but, I strum and sing mostly on tenor guitar and like the close harmony of chords in DGBE tuning (If I were playing a break, I would prefer to play mandolin). I might try re-entrant tuning on the tenor guitar, I need to change strings soon anyway.
    Last edited by bunnyf; 09-23-2019 at 03:37 AM.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cornfield View Post
    Right now it's tuned in fifths so I'll need a whole new set of strings. I like fifths tuning but it's just not embedded in my DNA.
    When I bought my tenor guitar, it was tuned in fifths but I re-tuned it to Chicago tuning with no problem. As a matter of fact, I still have the same strings on my guitar even though that was way over a year ago. Therefore all you'd really need to do is put a new G string on. And then put the rest of your clothes on. And then go to the store and get a new 4th string.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by bunnyf View Post
    I have a short scale steel string tenor guitar, which I currently have strung low D. I have been thinking, too, of changing the tuning. I often play with other six-string guitar players and thought a different tuning would help to add a different sound. I hadn't considered re-entrant but that might be a choice. I like the way it sounds and I have had it on my baritone uke in the past (don't play bari much since I got the TG tho). I didn't keep it on though because I much prefer the logic of linear for finding melody notes finger style (and appreciate the few extra notes). I also am considering traditional fifths tuning, as this would definitely put me in a different sonic space. I do love the range and symmetry of fifths tuning (for playing lead), but, I strum and sing mostly on tenor guitar and like the close harmony of chords in DGBE tuning (If I were playing a break, I would prefer to play mandolin). I might try re-entrant tuning on the tenor guitar, I need to change strings soon anyway.
    At one time I had it in linear Chicago tuning but I have several 6 string guitars and can play them that way. I like the wide open sound of chords in fifths tuning when playing in an ensemble but that's rare for me. I mostly play and sing solo. I think the re-entrant might give it an unusual voice that will make it stand out.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by ripock View Post
    When I bought my tenor guitar, it was tuned in fifths but I re-tuned it to Chicago tuning with no problem. As a matter of fact, I still have the same strings on my guitar even though that was way over a year ago. Therefore all you'd really need to do is put a new G string on. And then put the rest of your clothes on. And then go to the store and get a new 4th string.
    I've done that too but intonation suffers. It also puts unusual stress on the neck. This is a 1928 Martin 2-18T tenor guitar that does not have a truss rod.

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